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Thread: Is sharpness directly related to thickness

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Snips View Post
    kinda disagree. this would mean that a straight blade with a dull edge is sharper than a CCK with a very refined and stropped edge.

    sharpness, performance and efficiency are all different in my opinion.

    i think your definition of sharpness applies in most places but here on these forums, i would have to disagree
    It would seem that you are saying that a cck is not thin. Mine's pretty bloody thin, and huge to boot. It is kind of a prime example of what I am talking about--lots of metal behind a VERY small area, and it does cut, even when dull, pretty dang well. My CCK is a great performing knife, just because it is thin--the steel sucks, and the profile is ok, but the design of it is pretty fantastic.

    It's not my definition of sharpness--"sharp" just means "cuts well". To use it colloquially to mean something more specific will only cause confusion, and is unnecessary, since there are more accurate terms for the qualities of a knife that are often refered to as "sharpness". One that comes to mind is "a polished edge". A tissue-paper slice test does not test the cutting efficiency of a tool--only shows how well the bevels are matched and polished--and I've seen more than one knife that will push-cut paper and still cuts food like crap.

    An example of a knife that is thick and cuts well would be a Shigefusa--thick, and cuts with primo efficiency, because Iizuka san has nailed the profile, distal taper, balance point and face grind. A thick knife that cuts like crap would be a Farberware--thick in the back, poorly ground, and not matter how you sharpen it, it will always cut like crap. Compare that Farberware to a Tojiro DP, which has a simple grind and bad balance, and the Tojiro will out perform the Farberware even when dull--simply because it is thinner.

    There are factors to a knife other than cutting power, but when it comes to that, the CCK 1303 is a bang-for-the-buck MONSTER.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    It would seem that you are saying that a cck is not thin. Mine's pretty bloody thin, and huge to boot. It is kind of a prime example of what I am talking about--lots of metal behind a VERY small area, and it does cut, even when dull, pretty dang well. My CCK is a great performing knife, just because it is thin--the steel sucks, and the profile is ok, but the design of it is pretty fantastic.

    It's not my definition of sharpness--"sharp" just means "cuts well". To use it colloquially to mean something more specific will only cause confusion, and is unnecessary, since there are more accurate terms for the qualities of a knife that are often refered to as "sharpness". One that comes to mind is "a polished edge". A tissue-paper slice test does not test the cutting efficiency of a tool--only shows how well the bevels are matched and polished--and I've seen more than one knife that will push-cut paper and still cuts food like crap.

    An example of a knife that is thick and cuts well would be a Shigefusa--thick, and cuts with primo efficiency, because Iizuka san has nailed the profile, distal taper, balance point and face grind. A thick knife that cuts like crap would be a Farberware--thick in the back, poorly ground, and not matter how you sharpen it, it will always cut like crap. Compare that Farberware to a Tojiro DP, which has a simple grind and bad balance, and the Tojiro will out perform the Farberware even when dull--simply because it is thinner.

    There are factors to a knife other than cutting power, but when it comes to that, the CCK 1303 is a bang-for-the-buck MONSTER.
    i guess i shouldn't have made a reference to a knife i dont own, but i thought i remembered hearing that the CCKs are very thick behind the edge. usually when something is thick behind the edge it can be really sharp but not perform as well. this was the point i was trying to make with that comparison. i guess another way to describe what i mean is any single bevel knife. the thickness of that knife at the spine vs. the edge is a completely different story to how sharp and refined the actual edge is

    i understand what you are saying and thats why i "kinda disagree" but around here, it is not really defined what sharp actually means. my only point was that to me, sharpness is the actual edge and performance is something completely different, just like how you described your CCK
    It's like my ol' grandpappy used to say; "The less one makes declarative statements, the less apt he is to look a fool in retrospect"

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Snips View Post
    i guess i shouldn't have made a reference to a knife i dont own, but i thought i remembered hearing that the CCKs are very thick behind the edge. usually when something is thick behind the edge it can be really sharp but not perform as well. this was the point i was trying to make with that comparison. i guess another way to describe what i mean is any single bevel knife. the thickness of that knife at the spine vs. the edge is a completely different story to how sharp and refined the actual edge is

    i understand what you are saying and thats why i "kinda disagree" but around here, it is not really defined what sharp actually means. my only point was that to me, sharpness is the actual edge and performance is something completely different, just like how you described your CCK
    I see what you are saying, and I can't say it is directly wrong, since "sharp" is such a vague term. I would have to say, however, that in any circles other than those of knife enthusiasts, referring to an edge as "sharp" can work. I've found that there isn't any one clear type of sharp, I don't see edges as crappy or good anymore, only different, and I judge them by how intentional I can tell they were put there, so lumping the different types of working edges into one category can be a little onerous when folks are learning and minutiae are being discussed.



    Oh and CCKs are SUPER thick spine at the handle, but they are insanely thin, if you consider it a ratio from surface area to thickness. They performance of a huge sheet of steel is actually surprising--they may seem like they were knocked together, but they are quite an elegant solution.

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