Quantcast
Kochi 240 mm kuro-uchi gyuto in V2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: Kochi 240 mm kuro-uchi gyuto in V2

  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,221

    Kochi 240 mm kuro-uchi gyuto in V2

    DCs recent KU posts got me thinking that I need to write acouple of reviews.

    Ive been using the 240 mm kuro-uchi finished Kochi for acouple of weeks now and I am very impressed. If my memory serves me, it is thebest pure cutter I have ever used. That is, the amount of resistanceencountered by the user is the least of any similarly sized gyuto I have everused. This maker utilizes a slightly concave grind to achieve a geometry thatis surprisingly thin (I dont get surprised too often anymore.) behind the edgebut substantial at the spine and flexes very little compared to knives groundin the pointier Masamoto style that tend to be quite flexible toward the tip.The drawback is that the tip on the Kochi is less pointed, like a santoku. Mymajor concern with this knife was the strength of the blade near the edge. Icut pretty steep bevels (perhaps 10 deg on a side) into this knife and they arestill merely a hairs width. (It sharpens very easily to a VERY keen edge,btw.) I can see the edge flex a good 3+ mm from the edge (this is a long wayfrom the cutting edge) as I run my nail down the length of it. Yet, it flewthrough everything I threw at it and I cannot detect any deformation in themetal behind the edge. Food release was also outstanding(not the absolute best but pretty close) considering it is a fairly tall knife(53 mm over the heel). I had to chuckle to myself as I tried to chop potatoes,etc. nice and slow to allow them to adhere properly. I was impressed with the edgeholding although I did manage to microchip a little in the curved area towardthe tip. This is probably the place where I tend to do the most chopping and I purposefully tried to be a little rough with it. Thekuro-uchi finish was even and stable. Neither the steel nor the cladding were particularly reactive. The handle was nice and substantial and although I dont like that look,the burnt chestnut does afford a very stable-feeling grip. The fit and finishis excellent, as well. The spine and choil are eased toward the handle and completelyrounded toward the tip. As far as I can tell, there are no bends or twists inthe blade.

    Overall, Im very impressed with the quality of this knifeand the cutting ability, in particular. While I didnt have any trouble withdeformation, I would hate to put this knife in the hands of someone that mightthrow it into a sink or cut a bone with it, etc. due to the thinness near theedge. Over a long period of time, in my hands, this knife would lose someperformance since I cannot hollow grind the secondary (non-cutting) bevel butit would clearly be a while before it got to that point and even so, I think it would continueto be a very good cutter. At $280, I think this knife might win the smiles per dollar category.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    314
    Sounds like a winner. Got any pics?

    As for grinding, I think Dave could do us all a favor and import some of those 4 foot diameter, 8 inch wide wheels that most Japanese knifemakers seem to use. Shipping would probably be under $1,000......

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,221
    Quote Originally Posted by wsfarrell View Post
    Sounds like a winner. Got any pics?...
    My pics suck and Jon has nice ones on the Japanese Knife Imports site that accurately reflect the blade that I have.

    Quote Originally Posted by wsfarrell View Post
    As for grinding, I think Dave could do us all a favor and import some of those 4 foot diameter, 8 inch wide wheels that most Japanese knifemakers seem to use. Shipping would probably be under $1,000......
    That would indeed be good but I would prefer to see Jon get one of those so I can park myself in front of it while he's busy with customers, lol.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canoga Park, CA
    Posts
    143
    Thanks for this post -- I've been looking at those knives on the JKI website a bunch since they first went up. Excellent review.

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,221
    Thanks. Now we need a pro to put this thing through the wringer.

  6. #6
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    856
    lol, I dare you to give it to Pesky for a month
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  7. #7
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    618
    Nice review. I'm not a fan of the shape of those blades though...seem a bit clunky to me from the pics.

    Maybe I'm the oddman out, but I seem to have a different definition of "best or purest" cutter. My old thinned out Hiromoto 300 gyuto would cut so easily with no resistance due to the weight of the blade and altered geometry...but I still much prefer super thin knives for most things and feel like they are the best cutters above all else for me for how they perform. I think different techniques play a big part of it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,221
    Haha. I know thin. I was trying to spare you people my picture taking skillz but... Which do you think is thinner? One is my 240 (really 240) Carter, another is the 240 (245) Kochi, the last is my thinned out 270 (really 263) Kon HD.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	kochi spine.jpg
Views:	116
Size:	34.8 KB
ID:	1858Click image for larger version

Name:	kochi choil.jpg
Views:	127
Size:	27.1 KB
ID:	1859
    The Kochi is the top and left one. Four inches from the tip, it is 1.75 mm, the Carter is 1.72, KonHD is 1.81. At the heel, the forged knife is always thicker but even there, you can see that a few mm behind the edge, the Kochi is thinnest. At 4 mm behind the edge, the Carter is 0.62 mm thick on average over three points. The Kon HD was 0.56 and the Kochi was 0.43 mm thick at the same distance from the edge. Also take into account that I thinned the crap out of my HD. So what's thin to you? "Pure cutting" basically means chopping. No drawing the knife as you cut to reduce sticking or friction, etc. This knife will outperform any other that I've seen or modified.

  9. #9
    Engorged Member
    El Pescador's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,901
    I was lucky enough to use it for a bit and it one of the thinnest 240mm gyutos behind the edge I have used. I am only allowed to use it IN TK59's kitchen and under no circumstances can I take it to work.

  10. #10
    Senior Member mattrud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    545
    I agree with Tk on this knife. I used Jon's briefly and it is a nice knife. Both the kurochi and the polish blades have very nice geometry and great feel. One of my favorite knives that Jon has at his shop. His single bevel Geshin line was also impressive.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts