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How to even out the contact patch?
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Thread: How to even out the contact patch?

  1. #1

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    How to even out the contact patch?

    So I was chopping some stuff, and noticed some parts of it arent detaching from the food, so I added a slight draw to the chops so they would come out clean.

    Anyways, after I was done, I put the blade against a flat edge and saw some light leaking through, which mean the the contact patch isnt entirely even.

    I thought about sharpening that section more than the other but that might not solve my problem as I may not have the control to even it out like that . or maybe I should grind hte edge to even, then sharpen the edge back up ?

    It would be great if someone can help. oh and btw the knife is a hiromoto gyuto

  2. #2

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    The latter. Grind the edge even, then sharpen it. Put it on your coarsest grit stone or plate, perpendicular to the stone, like as if it was a cutting surface. Run it back and forth until you are satisfied with out flat it is, then restore the edge bevels. It shouldn't take too much.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  3. #3
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    I've done that to flatten my usuba. Be careful, do it slowly because it can eat a lot of steel in a hurry doing it like that

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    If it's your first time doing so, grind at 45° rather than 90°. You'll remove steel less quickly, and it will be faster to restore the edge when you're done.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmccurtis View Post
    If it's your first time doing so, grind at 45° rather than 90°. You'll remove steel less quickly, and it will be faster to restore the edge when you're done.
    And if the "hole" isn't too deep, you don't have to use a super coarse stone. The thin metal near the edge really gets chewed up that way. For minor fixes, I sometimes will use the side of a 1k stone, for example.

  6. #6

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    Btw, that is called a hole in the edge.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Btw, that is called a hole in the edge.
    Is that a technical term?

  8. #8

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    Yep, and it isn't synonymous with an overgrind, because it can be caused by just sharpening too much in one area, which is easy to fix. An overground face bevel is bad news, and also can cause a hole in the edge.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Please verify if enough clad has been removed, as it might come very near to the edge, especially on the back side.

  10. #10

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    Concerned about other advice given here!

    Quote Originally Posted by MWhtrader View Post
    Anyways, after I was done, I put the blade against a flat edge and saw some light leaking through, which mean the the contact patch isnt entirely even.
    the knife is a hiromoto gyuto
    Hi, it sounds as if your knife is an un-usual Gyuto in that it sounds as if your knife is ground with a bevel only on one side? If your Gyuto is like this then it is like a Yanagiba which is made with a concave hollow on the 'Flat Side'. This is there for a purpose, and helps to reduce the amount that the food sticks to the blade.

    I seriously hope that you have not followed the advice given elsewhere to your post as you will have wrecked your expensive knife! I know from experience as I did the same to a cheap Yanagiba before I knew what that hollow was for.

    For further info see the page
    http://zknives.com/knives/articles/k...types.shtml#SG

    In order to leave the concave hollow on the 'Flat Side' you must not grind it on any kind of flat stone! You will need to sharpen only on the bevelled side, then only remove the burr that this causes on the 'Flat Side'.

    To do that my recommendation would be to lightly use a small narrow piece of wood with very fine abrasive paper glued to it (or a very narrow fine stone if you happen to have it). Follow the 'flat' near the edge and you will remove the burr without removing the hollow.

    I hope I've been in time!
    Last edited by Greg the Yeti; 10-23-2011 at 01:25 PM. Reason: Clarity

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