Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Reshaping western handle

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    248

    Reshaping western handle

    I have the bolsterless version of Hiromoto Honyaki which I have spent significant time thinning and making convex. I am now moving onto giving the handle some love which I am looking to reshape and refinish it. The handle is made of basic unfinished rosewood.

    Something I should mention is that I live in an apartment and have no space for power tools of any sort and will basically have to do everything by hand.

    Does anyone have recommendations on what set up I should have? Any tips and tricks which may make my life easier would also be appreciated.

    Thanks!


  2. #2
    Matus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3,990
    Well, a photo would help. But you want some basic way to clamp the blade to a table, then some 80/180/320/600 (give or take) sandpaper. I would add steel wool, but not in an apartment. It makes a lot of nasty steel dust. maybe even some finer D-shaped (cross section) file - depending how much you want to change to original handle.

    Some pieces of wood - a short rod with a diameter of some 10 - 15 mm, a small rectangular piece, etc - to use as a support for the sandpaper while sanding. In the later stages of sanding (320 and 600) you may cut a narrow, long piece of the sandpaper, tape/glue it to some flexible material (piece of jeans cloth, etc.) and use it manually as a sanding belt. For finish you need to decide whether you just use some board butter, or something like Tung oil, or TruOil.

    You will want some tape wrap the blade in. I have made great experience with the wide, thick, orange Tesa - leaves nearly no residue.

    I am sure others will chime in with more/different ideas. There surely are many ways to do this.

    Oh, and get some basic respirator, you do not want to breath wooden dust.


  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    1,658
    Depending on what shaping you want to do a rounded smooth or Bastard file may male it quicker and/or easier than dowel and sandpaper. But if it is detail worn without much material removal than Matus's suggestions are probably close to right.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    64
    Quote Originally Posted by sharptools View Post
    I have the bolsterless version of Hiromoto Honyaki which I have spent significant time thinning and making convex. I am now moving onto giving the handle some love which I am looking to reshape and refinish it. The handle is made of basic unfinished rosewood.

    Something I should mention is that I live in an apartment and have no space for power tools of any sort and will basically have to do everything by hand.

    Does anyone have recommendations on what set up I should have? Any tips and tricks which may make my life easier would also be appreciated.

    Thanks!
    You don't (obviously, at least) say where you are. That can affect terminology and availability. (Lesson learned try to describe drywall screen to Triggaaar.) Also some idea of the shape you have (photos!) and a description of how much you want to change it.

    First thought is what Matus said, a sequence of sandpaper grades. Though I'd suggest a patio or balcony. For larger changes fine rasps or wood files come to mind. (Metal files can work, but are often finer than used for wood shaping.) And of course, blades can remove more material faster, but all that depends on what you're trying to achieve and how much budget you have for tools for this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    87
    for shaping handles with hand tools - I've found these very useful:

    https://www.japanesetools.com.au/pro...hinto-saw-rasp

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    toronto
    Posts
    472
    thinning the bolster less version? From what I recall, they aren't exactly thick either, especially that lovely thin tip section.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    248
    Quote Originally Posted by Matus View Post
    Well, a photo would help. But you want some basic way to clamp the blade to a table, then some 80/180/320/600 (give or take) sandpaper. I would add steel wool, but not in an apartment. It makes a lot of nasty steel dust. maybe even some finer D-shaped (cross section) file - depending how much you want to change to original handle.

    Some pieces of wood - a short rod with a diameter of some 10 - 15 mm, a small rectangular piece, etc - to use as a support for the sandpaper while sanding. In the later stages of sanding (320 and 600) you may cut a narrow, long piece of the sandpaper, tape/glue it to some flexible material (piece of jeans cloth, etc.) and use it manually as a sanding belt. For finish you need to decide whether you just use some board butter, or something like Tung oil, or TruOil.

    You will want some tape wrap the blade in. I have made great experience with the wide, thick, orange Tesa - leaves nearly no residue.

    I am sure others will chime in with more/different ideas. There surely are many ways to do this.

    Oh, and get some basic respirator, you do not want to breath wooden dust.
    I will try to post some photos later today.

    Quote Originally Posted by inzite View Post
    thinning the bolster less version? From what I recall, they aren't exactly thick either, especially that lovely thin tip section.
    I don't know about others but mine needed work. The distal taper is good but overall it was not thin behind the edge in any way.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    toronto
    Posts
    472
    Quote Originally Posted by sharptools View Post
    I will try to post some photos later today.



    I don't know about others but mine needed work. The distal taper is good but overall it was not thin behind the edge in any way.
    probably variations I bet. I only have the 180mm so I can't speak of the 240 variants but the front part of the blade is sufficiently thin behind the edge especially if you take the effort to tackle it lightly every sharpening.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    49
    The tool I find most useful for that kind of work is a double ended tapered rasp. It looks a lot like this one:

    http://www.dilegnosupply.com/_images...ail%20File.JPG


  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    64
    Quote Originally Posted by stuplarosa View Post
    The tool I find most useful for that kind of work is a double ended tapered rasp....
    I'm not sure a $42 tool would be my choice for a one-time project. Maybe sharptools can weigh in on what he's looking for? (If handle shaping is his new hobby, that combo rasp would be great for several to many handles. OTOH- If he's working on several a day, looking at a set of Auriou or Logiers hand cut rasps would probably be even better.)


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •