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Thread: How do you a define a screaming-sharp edge?

  1. #1

    How do you a define a screaming-sharp edge?

    There are probably as many definitions as there are people sharpening, but what would be a good basic definition that could be used as a reference for sharpness?

    I was thinking an edge that can pierce skin of a ripe tomato on contact is a screaming-sharp.

    M


    "All beauty that has no foundation in use, soon grows distasteful and needs continuous replacement with something new." The Shakers' saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  2. #2
    As far as buffed edges go, the hanging hair test is my go-to. Mostly because I only put edges like that on straights, and those are supposed to breeze through hair. Push cutting tissue is a good one too.

  3. #3
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    If you're asking what kind of edge you should be putting on your knives out the door, I probably wouldn't go past 5k and then whatever it takes to deburr. I think most users are going to benefit most from that edge. Piercing the tomato on contact is a nice trick and I like to get my edges there but it's really not any more useful than a nice 5k edge with maybe a little extra refinement on a strop.

  4. #4
    Think there are two answers.

    What edge is good for a high use chef and what edge is good for a low use home cook, I think tk59 has far more knowledge than a newbie like me and I would absolutely defer to him technically on what might be the best compromise but if im buying a knife I want it screaming sharp OOB

  5. #5
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    Someone should post a link to the video salty just did on Mario's 250mm gyuto. That's screaming sharp to me...

  6. #6
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Quote Originally Posted by welshstar View Post
    ... but if im buying a knife I want it screaming sharp OOB
    Get used to disappointment.

  7. #7
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    I think Murray has the right idea. He puts a nice, toothy 6k edge on it that will push cut a tomato with a few strokes on a loaded strop. It cuts effortlessly with just a little foward or backward motion.

  8. #8
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    The same edge should serve both a pro and a home cook. Edges that cut tomatoes with the weight of the blade and hair-whittling razor edges are tributes to the skill of the sharpener, but neither will survive contact with a board in real world use.

    just my 2 cents.

    Quote Originally Posted by welshstar View Post
    Think there are two answers.

    What edge is good for a high use chef and what edge is good for a low use home cook, I think tk59 has far more knowledge than a newbie like me and I would absolutely defer to him technically on what might be the best compromise but if im buying a knife I want it screaming sharp OOB
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    The same edge should serve both a pro and a home cook. Edges that cut tomatoes with the weight of the blade and hair-whittling razor edges are tributes to the skill of the sharpener, but neither will survive contact with a board in real world use.

    just my 2 cents.
    I agree

  10. #10
    Thanks fellas.

    So the screaming edge in practical terms would be 5-6K edge stropped. What do you load your strop with?

    M


    "All beauty that has no foundation in use, soon grows distasteful and needs continuous replacement with something new." The Shakers' saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

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