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How do you a define a screaming-sharp edge?
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Thread: How do you a define a screaming-sharp edge?

  1. #1

    How do you a define a screaming-sharp edge?

    There are probably as many definitions as there are people sharpening, but what would be a good basic definition that could be used as a reference for sharpness?

    I was thinking an edge that can pierce skin of a ripe tomato on contact is a screaming-sharp.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  2. #2
    As far as buffed edges go, the hanging hair test is my go-to. Mostly because I only put edges like that on straights, and those are supposed to breeze through hair. Push cutting tissue is a good one too.

  3. #3
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    If you're asking what kind of edge you should be putting on your knives out the door, I probably wouldn't go past 5k and then whatever it takes to deburr. I think most users are going to benefit most from that edge. Piercing the tomato on contact is a nice trick and I like to get my edges there but it's really not any more useful than a nice 5k edge with maybe a little extra refinement on a strop.

  4. #4
    Think there are two answers.

    What edge is good for a high use chef and what edge is good for a low use home cook, I think tk59 has far more knowledge than a newbie like me and I would absolutely defer to him technically on what might be the best compromise but if im buying a knife I want it screaming sharp OOB

  5. #5
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    Someone should post a link to the video salty just did on Mario's 250mm gyuto. That's screaming sharp to me...

  6. #6
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Quote Originally Posted by welshstar View Post
    ... but if im buying a knife I want it screaming sharp OOB
    Get used to disappointment.

  7. #7
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    I think Murray has the right idea. He puts a nice, toothy 6k edge on it that will push cut a tomato with a few strokes on a loaded strop. It cuts effortlessly with just a little foward or backward motion.

  8. #8
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    The same edge should serve both a pro and a home cook. Edges that cut tomatoes with the weight of the blade and hair-whittling razor edges are tributes to the skill of the sharpener, but neither will survive contact with a board in real world use.

    just my 2 cents.

    Quote Originally Posted by welshstar View Post
    Think there are two answers.

    What edge is good for a high use chef and what edge is good for a low use home cook, I think tk59 has far more knowledge than a newbie like me and I would absolutely defer to him technically on what might be the best compromise but if im buying a knife I want it screaming sharp OOB
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    The same edge should serve both a pro and a home cook. Edges that cut tomatoes with the weight of the blade and hair-whittling razor edges are tributes to the skill of the sharpener, but neither will survive contact with a board in real world use.

    just my 2 cents.
    I agree

  10. #10
    Thanks fellas.

    So the screaming edge in practical terms would be 5-6K edge stropped. What do you load your strop with?

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

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