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  1. #11
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    Scrapers are the simplest and most effective tools that exist. A piece of broken glass will also work!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  2. #12
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Scrapers are the simplest and most effective tools that exist. A piece of broken glass will also work!
    What? Now, after making 300 handles you are telling me ? To be honest, I don't have the slightest idea how to use a scraper, but it sounds like it is worth looking into. Other than that, I think you got some great tips, I can't think of anything to add.

    Stefan

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius9 View Post
    What? Now, after making 300 handles you are telling me ? To be honest, I don't have the slightest idea how to use a scraper, but it sounds like it is worth looking into. Other than that, I think you got some great tips, I can't think of anything to add.

    Stefan
    Stefan, scrapers are very simple to use, just run them along the area that you want smoothed or removed until you get the desired effect. Once you get enough practice you'll be able to skip most grits of rough to medium sand paper and jump into 400 without much issue.

  4. #14
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    The trick with scrapers is in the prep. To get the most out of them they need to have the edge filed and stoned flat and then have a burr raised with a burnisher. This makes a very sharp fine cutting edge on each side of it. When properly prepped you can make fine little curly shavings like what you would get from a tiny handplane, with a surface that can be finish ready.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  5. #15
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    So if I were to make my own little saya, what type of wood would work for that? I want something like the handle in color and easy to deal with. Nothing fancy by any means. I also want to know if the woods (e.g. maple or pine) would need some kind of special treatment before I use them.

  6. #16
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    Poplar is a good choice as far as ease of working goes, and it should match up well with the handle wood.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #17
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    Thanks, Spike. I'll look around for that. Not always easy to find woodworking shops in Manhattan.

  8. #18
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    For the size piece that you need you could mail order it. For example:

    http://www.woodworkerssource.com/Poplar.html
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

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