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Thread: A Basic Explanation of Asymmetry

  1. #31
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bolek View Post
    Thanks. Will try.
    What kind of knife is concerned?


  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    U

    What kind of knife is concerned?
    First atempt will be made on a valuless SS quite sharp and fine behind the edge butcher knife. If it is a succes then a blue 2 Zakuri gyuto.


  3. #33
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    Really excellent post. First time I've seen a good explanation of why asymmetry might be a beneficial thing, and not just a product of the craftsmen having a right-hand bias!

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bolek View Post
    First atempt will be made on a valuless SS quite sharp and fine behind the edge butcher knife. If it is a succes then a blue 2 Zakuri gyuto.
    Are you trying to thin the grind or correct steering?

  5. #35
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    Very interesting.
    Has anyone tried the grind like in figure 7 on traditional single-bevel knives?
    I have never seen someone grind the ura like that before.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodworkcan View Post
    Very interesting.
    Has anyone tried the grind like in figure 7 on traditional single-bevel knives?
    I have never seen someone grind the ura like that before.
    The uraoshi of a traditional knife is slightly concave and meant to be sharpened flat. There is precious little metal to work with for adding bevels. Some people put micro bevels on the heel of the uraoshi for strength on debas but it isn't wise to go further than that. In order to put a grind like # 7 on a single bevel you'd have to grind the uraoshi to the point of negating the design and/or ruining the knife completely.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by tripleq View Post
    The uraoshi of a traditional knife is slightly concave and meant to be sharpened flat. There is precious little metal to work with for adding bevels. Some people put micro bevels on the heel of the uraoshi for strength on debas but it isn't wise to go further than that. In order to put a grind like # 7 on a single bevel you'd have to grind the uraoshi to the point of negating the design and/or ruining the knife completely.
    That is also my concern and my understanding of the single-bevel design. And why I don't want to try with my "nice" knives.

  8. #38
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    So the general fix for unwanted steering is to thin the blade? What if you've been doing light thinning before every sharpening (low-angle) and notice steering while cutting? A more intense thinning is warranted then?

    Now for probably a silly question (and I'm not sure how to word it correctly): If I'm a lefty, and I'm just sharpening regularly (without any notice to asymmetry), can it have negative consequences if I hand it to a righty? i.e. Could I cause steering to the left just as a consequence of sharpening naturally as a lefty?

  9. #39
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    For a part steering is an individual question. It depends partially on your grip and the orientation of your wrist. Some people can compensate huge steering, without being aware of it anymore. Find out under which angle the blade performs the best. Try cutting by pulling without any pressure and see which inclination the blade takes.
    Thinning equally both sides behind the edge will reduce steering, not eliminate it.
    If it steers clockwise, you may reduce the friction on the right side or increase it on the left side, by taking a higher sharpening angle. Probably you should do both.
    For steering anti-clockwise do the opposite: thin the left side and increase the right angle.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanDan View Post
    So the general fix for unwanted steering is to thin the blade? What if you've been doing light thinning before every sharpening (low-angle) and notice steering while cutting? A more intense thinning is warranted then?
    It's hard to say without seeing the knife in person, but perhaps you have been thinning the bevel at a different angle from the original grind - or as you say, too light of a thinning. In this case a more intense thinning would work, if done only to the opposite side from the direction your blade is steering towards.



    But do it too much and you might end up with a symmetrical grind.

    Quote Originally Posted by DanDan View Post
    Could I cause steering to the left just as a consequence of sharpening naturally as a lefty?
    Your sharpening technique will have more of an influence over the steer, rather than your use of either the left or right hand.

    There's a bird on your shoulder.

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