Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating using the link above or becoming a Supporting Member.
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 37 of 37

Thread: A Basic Explanation of Asymmetry

  1. #31
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    4,365
    U
    Quote Originally Posted by Bolek View Post
    Thanks. Will try.
    What kind of knife is concerned?


  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    U

    What kind of knife is concerned?
    First atempt will be made on a valuless SS quite sharp and fine behind the edge butcher knife. If it is a succes then a blue 2 Zakuri gyuto.


  3. #33

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    32
    Really excellent post. First time I've seen a good explanation of why asymmetry might be a beneficial thing, and not just a product of the craftsmen having a right-hand bias!

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    287
    Quote Originally Posted by Bolek View Post
    First atempt will be made on a valuless SS quite sharp and fine behind the edge butcher knife. If it is a succes then a blue 2 Zakuri gyuto.
    Are you trying to thin the grind or correct steering?

  5. #35
    woodworkcan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    26
    Very interesting.
    Has anyone tried the grind like in figure 7 on traditional single-bevel knives?
    I have never seen someone grind the ura like that before.

  6. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    918
    Quote Originally Posted by woodworkcan View Post
    Very interesting.
    Has anyone tried the grind like in figure 7 on traditional single-bevel knives?
    I have never seen someone grind the ura like that before.
    The uraoshi of a traditional knife is slightly concave and meant to be sharpened flat. There is precious little metal to work with for adding bevels. Some people put micro bevels on the heel of the uraoshi for strength on debas but it isn't wise to go further than that. In order to put a grind like # 7 on a single bevel you'd have to grind the uraoshi to the point of negating the design and/or ruining the knife completely.

  7. #37
    woodworkcan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by tripleq View Post
    The uraoshi of a traditional knife is slightly concave and meant to be sharpened flat. There is precious little metal to work with for adding bevels. Some people put micro bevels on the heel of the uraoshi for strength on debas but it isn't wise to go further than that. In order to put a grind like # 7 on a single bevel you'd have to grind the uraoshi to the point of negating the design and/or ruining the knife completely.
    That is also my concern and my understanding of the single-bevel design. And why I don't want to try with my "nice" knives.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •