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Thread: Custom or not?

  1. #11
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    Nevermind.

  2. #12
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    After thinking about it some and reflecting on what I've done, I'd consider getting a great custom knife or other high end knife as long as you really get to understand how to use it and take care of it. I think you can adapt to using it as many here have adapted to using different styles of knives. If you don't feel you need ultimate performance or appearance, etc., stick to the CN since you like it so much.

  3. #13
    really? I think the best time to get a custom is when you have a clear understanding of what works for you in a knife. Think back and take a look at the custom knives you have. Are the first ones better than the more recent ones? As you learn more, your ability to "pick" knives that suit you will get better. I say take a look at what you like/dislike about what you have. Then look around and find something that fills in the weak areas of your current knife. If that happens to be a custom, cool. If it happens to be something thats already out there, that works too

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    really? I think the best time to get a custom is when you have a clear understanding of what works for you in a knife. Think back and take a look at the custom knives you have. Are the first ones better than the more recent ones? As you learn more, your ability to "pick" knives that suit you will get better. I say take a look at what you like/dislike about what you have. Then look around and find something that fills in the weak areas of your current knife. If that happens to be a custom, cool. If it happens to be something thats already out there, that works too
    Wise words J ...

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    really? I think the best time to get a custom is when you have a clear understanding of what works for you in a knife. Think back and take a look at the custom knives you have. Are the first ones better than the more recent ones? As you learn more, your ability to "pick" knives that suit you will get better. I say take a look at what you like/dislike about what you have. Then look around and find something that fills in the weak areas of your current knife. If that happens to be a custom, cool. If it happens to be something thats already out there, that works too
    If I was rich (or crazy) I would follow this advice. It is what I did and I spent somewhere upwards of $10k on this stuff in a couple of years, give or take. I'm not saying you'll be that extreme but you might just get a great knife and be done. As your technique improves (assuming it needs improving), you'll grow into it. As I've been told numerous times, you can sell it if you don't like it. If it's a great knife, someone will take it.

  6. #16

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    hey, i never said you HAD to buy a custom... she's just asking here
    Gee, thanks, Jon. You have no idea what the peer pressure is like on this end.

  8. #18
    Here's some massive generalization about pricing chefs/gyutos:
    0-50 it's garbage.
    50-120 solid workhorse, probably needs some work/alteration, may not last forever in pro setting.
    120-400 Ripping performance, looks to match.
    400+ Looks precisely the way you want it to, love to hold/look at/use it, and performs in a manner that is suited exactly to how YOU use a knife and for what you are using it on, and hopefully shows character that is unique to the maker.

    Of course there are exceptions(CCK1303, Shigefusa gyuto, etc etc), but the way I see it, knives under $50 are unrealistic and basically props, and knives over $400 should be heirloom quality. Buy nice or buy twice, and if you love and care about your cutlery, buy custom when you can.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    After thinking about it some and reflecting on what I've done, I'd consider getting a great custom knife or other high end knife as long as you really get to understand how to use it and take care of it. I think you can adapt to using it as many here have adapted to using different styles of knives. If you don't feel you need ultimate performance or appearance, etc., stick to the CN since you like it so much.
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    If I was rich (or crazy) I would follow this advice. It is what I did and I spent somewhere upwards of $10k on this stuff in a couple of years, give or take. I'm not saying you'll be that extreme but you might just get a great knife and be done. As your technique improves (assuming it needs improving), you'll grow into it. As I've been told numerous times, you can sell it if you don't like it. If it's a great knife, someone will take it.
    I think you might be taking your experiences too much in account with your thought process of what someone who is just starting out should do...hindsight is always 20/20, but it was everything leading up to now that shaped your current views.

    Yes, anyone can adapt or grow into any knife...but is that what they would actually prefer? I could adapt to a Shun Classic curved profile if that is all I had, but it is not what I would naturally prefer and like after trying many different knives and styles through my experiences. You bought your first carbon blade just over a year ago, and that opened up your experiences to non-stainless blades...but if you purchased a custom stainless at the time (and didn't buying anything else), then you wouldn't of known that carbon might be your preference over stainless for that particular custom.

    I've always thought that the most rewarding part of this obsession/hobby is the journey itself...building up your knowledge, skills and tools along the way to fit your specific needs and wants. I guess it really doesn't matter which route the OP chooses, as most knives can be sold off here for a small loss, but I think there is something great about taking the journey...it makes you appreciate all the higher-end knives that much more, don't you think?

    Customs are not for everyone either--I am perfectly happy with all of my current knives and don't feel a need or itch to go custom right now, if ever. This shouldn't make me any less of a knut.

  10. #20
    also, the concept that all customs are good is a misconception... there are good customs and there are not good customs (and both might be expensive). Just getting a custom knife doesnt ensure that you will get a good knife. Not only do you need to make sure you buy from a knifemaker you trust, but you also need to make sure their knife design/style mesh well with your cutting style and preferences. You could buy a knife from a great knifemaker and still be unhappy with it. Actually, the same rings true for non-custom knives.

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