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Thread: Does your knife have soul?

  1. #11
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    I would say knives have soul stainless or not there is something there, as long as there is a personal connection between the knife and you. Whether it is a knife you don't use often but you find it more enjoyable to sharpen than others, or something you modified and made a better performer out of.

    My moritaka for example the KU scale started coming off from the first use and over the next 8 months I helped it along with green srcubbies, and dealt with the ridiculously reactive cladding. It today looks alomost nothing like most moritakas and if you saw the right hand side of it you'd probably never guess it was one of his knives. I would say it has tons of personality, now my Monzaburo Kiritsuke in Ginsanko, I'd say this knife has more soul, I love the dull grey look of the Ginsanko, the way it cuts, the heft of it....., I love them both but the admiration is different. Wouldn't part with either one or any of them.

    Knives definitely have soul and it is personal between you and the knife.

  2. #12
    Soul knife.....
    This is a 8" slicer I made from used, m42 bandsaw steel. It's thin, maybe 1.55mm the entire length, and came to me that way. I use it, toss it aside for a while, think about it, come back and refine the edge with stones or belts, use it some more, and learn from the whole process. It will probably end up being maybe 6" long by the time I have figured out how to grind it w/o overgrinds, w/o beating up the handle, w/o rounding off the tip, and on and on. Nothing much will be lost but some free steel, several hours of my time and a piece of maple. The knowledge gained will more than compensate for the losses. This knife more than any other I have made has imparted the most knowledge. It's a beater, always has been, always will be; but to me it's soulful.
    Tom Gray, Seagrove, NC

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    My moritaka for example the KU scale started coming off from the first use and over the next 8 months I helped it along with green srcubbies, and dealt with the ridiculously reactive cladding. It today looks alomost nothing like most moritakas and if you saw the right hand side of it you'd probably never guess it was one of his knives.
    Moritakas rust like a motherf**ker.
    Oh, and there's one sure way to identify a Moritaka...ain't that right Dave?
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  4. #14
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    I have been thinking about this recently as well. I think that the handmade blades and wood handles really show character, patina or not. There are all of those little imperfections or differences, but in a good way, that give each blade it's own soul. A kitaeji blade is like a fingerprint, I would know mine from another by the pattern. The wood handles show signs of being used by their owner's hand, one can really feel connected to the knife and the one who made that knife.

    In contrast, when I pick up a Wusthof it feels cold and dead, no character, even if I have sharpened it.

  5. #15
    Senior Member/ Internet Hooligan
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    My Misono's got soul. Its had a hard life!




  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    The bottom one is a miroshi deba, so not too much exposure to acidic food and not too much usage in the Western kitchen either.

    M
    I know, was just to lazy to find a match and play around in Photoshop

  7. #17
    My knives souls come from myself. Especially my latest refurb project (in my blog) where I had to work the steel, had it baptized in my own blood during the process and built my own handle and saya. I doesn't exactly hurt that it is a honyaki blade that has been abandoned by several others but has finally found a home with me. That, for me makes a blade with a genuine soul.

    DarHOeK

  8. #18
    I can't comment on the end user, but whether starting with steel and forge, or flatbar stock removal, building a knife, going through each stage of the process, shaping, HT, grinding, hand rub, selecting handle materials and construction, all these steps add soul if you will, or character. Harald's restoration as well, will never be looked at the same by him. The sore fingers, lacerations from slips, building handle and saya, all imparts "soul" into a knife. Now, should it ever be sold, will the buyer see it as a new knife that needs soul, or as it is, a knife that was built/restored by hand, with care and soul?


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  9. #19
    To restore or build is a whole different ballgame - I have the deepest respect for people who does this put blood, sweat and tears + their soul into these projects! Since I don't make knifes myself my "soul" is not in the buildingdepartment - I'm only a user. When I looked at the picture I posted it got me thinking. To me - the patina knife showed "life". It told a story about the user and it showed usage.

    Stainless etc. are cool knifes as well. I got several. Still - this is my opinion - they don't change looks from usages - maybe exept from a few scratches. We are all different which is great. I think some patina's rock - others think it sucks. Ain't life great

  10. #20
    After some thinking I believe the soul of a knife can come from several places. Like the old Katana, the blacksmith left a part of his soul to the blade. The sharpener did the same as well as the warrior that owned it and went to battle with it for a long time. Every great happening adds to the blades soul. First for being made and then for surviving the hardships of its owners.

    Same thing with kitchen knives. A great chef using and caring for a custom knife for many years in the kitchen will add soul to the knife. The patina is maybe some expression of that soul. The next owner will be the keeper of a piece of history. If a great master blade smith made it and great master chefs have used it I believe some blades will be like a Stradivarius violin after a long time with almost magic properties. That is to me what custommade is all about.

    DarKHOeK

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