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Thread: White #2 vs Blue #2

  1. #1

    White #2 vs Blue #2

    Pros and cons?

  2. #2
    What if someone at factory put wrong labels and instead of blue 2 knife you got white? Would you notice if the knife was sharp and cut like you wanted?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    What if someone at factory put wrong labels and instead of blue 2 knife you got white? Would you notice if the knife was sharp and cut like you wanted?
    Well now I really feel educated - thanks a lot for a fine fine answer

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peco View Post
    Pros and cons?
    The properties of each are really so close that it's hard to tell in real world use. I have two Carter gyutos, one in white, one in blue, and the only way I can tell between them is the 'S' or 'W' stamped on the blade.

    Blue is more expensive, and has a reputation for better edge retention, while white is reportedly easier to get a good edge on.
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    The properties of each are really so close that it's hard to tell in real world use. I have two Carter gyutos, one in white, one in blue, and the only way I can tell between them is the 'S' or 'W' stamped on the blade.

    Blue is more expensive, and has a reputation for better edge retention, while white is reportedly easier to get a good edge on.
    Thanks ... Is one of them more reactive than the other - which is easiest to maintain - if any?

  6. #6
    technically blue should be less reactive than white, but the core steel is rarely the problem... cladding is usually the most reactive

  7. #7
    Im not sure you ever will feel the difference

    Ao-Ko II: Takes very fine edge, and holds it long time. Easy to sharpen. Less wear resistant than Ao-Ko I, but more tough.
    Shiro-Ko II or Shiro-ni-ko (Shirogami): Very good edge holding and takes a crazy sharp edge. I felt Haralds Shiro-Ko 3, and it was insane. Easy to sharpen.

    Many pro-users prefer to own Shiro-Ko II blades because of its good characteristic " Ease of resharpening" (easier to make sharp edge in the sharpening process), however some claim to have Ao-Ko II which will definitely outperform Shirogami

    Cons: You will destroy your blade if you don't baby it. And thats the reason why I love sanmai, with carbon hagane and stainless jigane.

  8. #8
    Great answer, thanks Ø.

    Jon, thanks.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    I have
    - white #1 (carter)
    - white #2 (tojiro)
    -white "spicy' (shige)
    - blue "super" (carter)
    - blue #2 (mizuno)

    In addition to the above comments i can add that blue #2/super is also maybe a hair tougher/ more chip resistant (although that could also be the temper). Also, it seems that although blue is even less reactive, it takes a darker colored patina when it does react.

  10. #10
    shigefusa is not white steel... its a Swedish carbon steel, but i like the white "Spicy" description

    The truth of steels like this is that you will see more of a difference between different makers heat treatments than most people will feel between different steels. Find a maker that does a steel well is the best advise i can give. There are differences though and there are people out there who can feel them. Will it matter for most people? Not so much.

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