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Thread: Honyaki care for a pro?

  1. #1
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    Question Honyaki care for a pro?

    So Iíve got a very nice Sukenari honyaki 270mm gyuto on the way. I know a few pros on here use them at work daily , and I have a honyaki santoku I got to test patina on , and my polishing . . I have simichrome on the way as well. Should I attempt to maintain the polish? Do it once in a while so patina doesnít build up too much ? Or just let it patina over ? Iím torn on this issue .

    I am not scared to use it as a daily driver as I have full control over my environment . I am a firm believer in using knives and not keeping drawer queens . I recently , for no good reason , starting going after a honyaki . I know itís not everyoneís first pick for work, but man I love the feedback they give ! And of course the aesthetic.

    Thanks!


  2. #2
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    Use it! Chasing patina is an endless battle, polish it sparingly as itís probably going to perform the same. If your confident in your skills then use it every day. Just remember they are like thoroughbreds, gonna be a little less forgiving. Also make sure you keep your eye on it. Let us know how itís working out!


  3. #3
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    I just let them patina. If any sign of rust comes about, i hit it with metal polish and if its too much for the metal polish, its off to Jon. Using metal polish too much can take off the hamon a bit too.

  4. #4
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    if the hamon is not polished.. i wld use a 600 or 800 grit sandpaper to clean and slowly polish it over each cleaning . Say after a few months, i wld progress to finer grit when the existing grit lines has been replaced with the present grit used

    IF mirror, i wld only use metal polish. I wld recommend a small buffing wheel attached to a drill for a fast job with metal polish.

    Best is a small buffer wheel...secured to a table.. i use one that costs abt usd$50. Low torgue wch is fine with me and i get to play with the various grits of diamond powder in oil...

    Hamon.. Fear not a quick 3 to 5 min rub job with Lemon and soap over a heated blade with hot water brings it back to life!

    hv fun Z

  5. #5
    Senior Member panda's Avatar
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    just use the hell out of it! please dont be one of those people who baby it and polish every time they use it. and then later down the road when you want a new toy PM me and i will take it off your hands so that you can get something new.

  6. #6
    Senior Member jklip13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zitangy View Post
    if the hamon is not polished.. i wld use a 600 or 800 grit sandpaper to clean and slowly polish it over each cleaning . Say after a few months, i wld progress to finer grit when the existing grit lines has been replaced with the present grit used

    IF mirror, i wld only use metal polish. I wld recommend a small buffing wheel attached to a drill for a fast job with metal polish.

    Best is a small buffer wheel...secured to a table.. i use one that costs abt usd$50. Low torgue wch is fine with me and i get to play with the various grits of diamond powder in oil...

    Hamon.. Fear not a quick 3 to 5 min rub job with Lemon and soap over a heated blade with hot water brings it back to life!

    hv fun Z
    All super solid advice. I'll just add this with regards to the buffing wheel: BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL. You are pushing a sharp knife into a cloth moving at hundreds of RPM. Always check which way the wheel is rotating, and which way the edge is facing. Concentrate as best you can. I'm sure the knife makers here can chime in with close calls, I've had one myself.
    A good knives wont make you better, only practice will, a good knife should make you practice.

  7. #7
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    i have a handful of honyaki i rotate out in my work kit regularly, i personally dont polish any of them until its time to sharpen or switch them out, otherwise you will spend as much time polishing as cutting . ive always just used metal polish to, specifically flitz, when it was time to polish. it will wash out the hamon over time but i just bring them back out with a little warm vinegar.

  8. #8
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Buffing wheel..


    http://www.caswellplating.com/buffman.htm#

    i) danger of it flying off wildly

    ii) danger of it moving sideways and cutting the fingers.

    a) IF wheel is moving towards you... always use the the are 180 degrees to 220 degrees so that it will fling forward

    b) tip work... POinting down in direction of rotation as propensity to catch it and move it sideways and danger of cutting

    c) wear gloves for the first few times

    d) Safest is always the edge pointing down and hold the handle firmly perpendicular to rotation

    e) best to make a wooden backing that will secure the neck of knife so that it cant move much... and the edge is always within the piece of wood...

    f) a large doze of common sense... apply "what if I do this" and if you can imagine the potential outcome... and there is no risk.. its a go.. IF there is a risk.. what can you do to minimise it...

    g) I hardly use the powerful bench grinder buffing wheel these days... the small one does stall if i press too hard... Still... the danger of cutting is always there..

    Finally... with the 800 grit wet sanding... its a quick one less than 2 minutes job provided you avoid the edge.. I leave mine at the kitchen sink and its always there... CLean and polish towards the eventual mirror shine someday.. OH.. use a rubber backing.. not the Trojan type.. but just an eraser ( used by students, for rubbing off pencil writings) of an appropriate size ( height and width) for the body and also the blade width below the shinogi line... and being soft.. it will conform to the shape of grind of knife

    Be safe and rub ... but not too much... Z

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the advice guys . I think Iíll let it gather some patina and take it off only if it turns an ugly color. No buffing wheels for me, but I appreciate the instructions . Maybe down the road , but Iím in an apartment right now , no space.

    Donít worry , I wonít become the guy who who polishes after every shift ! I am careful with my knives , but not to the point of babying . Interesting advice on bringing the hamon back out . Iíll meep that in mind .

    When it arrives , Iíll post up some pics in the new knife thread. Thanks again

  10. #10
    Senior Member LucasFur's Avatar
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    Interesting.
    I see people talk about flitz often.
    I have used Autosol to polish with really good results (in my opinion) i just put a dab on paper towel and rub till the paper towel falls apart. it removes all patina and puts a full mirror polish on really anything.
    I actually find it works faster then using a dremel because of the amount of surface area and always produces a more even finish.

    anybody have an opinion on autosol?


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