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Thread: about contrast

  1. #21
    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mute-on View Post
    Well it’s pretty much a natural version of the King 800.

    Better to ask Badgertooth. He knows everything about natural stones ...
    Haha, and no point jumping into that rabbit hole until you’re getting satisfactory Kasumi finishes on lower grit synthetic stones. Walk before you run. But FWIW, Hakka is a softish, easy to use, very hard to find natural stone that finishes around 6 - 8k typically. And Badgertooth knows a lot less about naturals than people give him credit for. I just have a erm.. magpie-like tendency to buy em


  2. #22
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    Really hard to accomplish if your blade road has highs/lows. Flatten it or at least make the convexing even along the entire blade road. Once that's accomplished it's much much easier.


  3. #23
    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt173 View Post
    I'm sorry.I don't know what is "μm". Is that like 5μm the same as 5K or 5000 grit ?
    Not quite. And I need to double check this but iirc 1 micron is about 14k so 4 microns is 14k / 4, so approx 3500 grit and 5 microns is a scooch under 3k.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badgertooth View Post
    Not quite. And I need to double check this but iirc 1 micron is about 14k so 4 microns is 14k / 4, so approx 3500 grit and 5 microns is a scooch under 3k.
    Thanks Badger.I am getting a better grip on it now.

  5. #25
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    I agree with Badger, but crawl first!

    I ran before I could walk and came to a full stop at a brick wall. Heh, I do not always take the advice given to me. I had a dozen naturals before I had half a dozen synthetics. This lead me stepping back and ignoring the naturals for a few months while I went back to the basics to work on my obviously flawed technique that my naturals made shine very brightly! I learned so much by going back to the synthetics for awhile and now I make myself do that every few months and each time I reassess my technique on synthetics I learn something new and utilize my naturals better. (And I am still far behind the curve compared to Otto and many others!)

    One thing I will say is that we, those of us who go through a lot of naturals, often times take chances when we buy a new stone or 12. You can get around this, to a large extent, by getting a used and known stone on BST, when and if the time comes. Often times the right Aoto or Monzen, etc can give you a very decent working kasumi for a very fair price. Just something to keep in mind for the future.
    -Kit

  6. #26
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt173 View Post
    On hand,I have a King 1000,a Shapton Pro 2000,and a Kohetsu 2000 so I have been working with them.I can achieve a dark grey contrast but with many shiny streaks throughout.I've tried heavy pressure and very light pressure with short and long strokes.I have been working up a pretty good mud even if I have to use a mini diamond plate to do so.The knife I am working on is a Masakage Mizu 240 Gyuto with Aogami #2 steel core..
    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt173 View Post
    I have been working hard at flattening the blade road completely as it was really humpted up all along the whole length of the blade on the right side and it sent carrots flying across the board with a loud snap.It took a lot of force too.That has gotten better with the thinning.Maybe I need to work with much lighter pressure with the King 1000 again.I'll see what happens when I work at it a little longer.
    If the lowest grit stone you have is that king 1000, flattening that blade road is going to be an extremely long and arduous task. Practically a fruitless journey. You need something more coarse to speed things up considerably. I use the Gesshin 400 for this task for both it's speed and the scratch pattern it leaves is a nice cosmetic base to follow up with the king 800. Then I finish the blade road with the Gesshin Jinzo Aoto. I don't think you don't really need the king before the Jinzo nor do you really need the Jinzo after the king but I just prefer the resulting appearance I can achieve with that progression.

    Check it out on my Gesshin Hide 210 kamagata usuba.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    If the lowest grit stone you have is that king 1000, flattening that blade road is going to be an extremely long and arduous task. Practically a fruitless journey. You need something more coarse to speed things up considerably. I use the Gesshin 400 for this task for both it's speed and the scratch pattern it leaves is a nice cosmetic base to follow up with the king 800. Then I finish the blade road with the Gesshin Jinzo Aoto. I don't think you don't really need the king before the Jinzo nor do you really need the Jinzo after the king but I just prefer the resulting appearance I can achieve with that progression.

    Check it out on my Gesshin Hide 210 kamagata usuba.
    That's beautiful.I sure would like to be able to do that.The King 1000 is the lowest stone I was using to try and achieve the contrast,However,I do have a Gesshin 400 but with that said,I tried thinning with a Shapton Pro 320 which is the lowest stone that I do have without digging out my DMT 220,which gives me goose bumps every time I think about it.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by K813zra View Post
    I agree with Badger, but crawl first!

    I ran before I could walk and came to a full stop at a brick wall. Heh, I do not always take the advice given to me. I had a dozen naturals before I had half a dozen synthetics. This lead me stepping back and ignoring the naturals for a few months while I went back to the basics to work on my obviously flawed technique that my naturals made shine very brightly! I learned so much by going back to the synthetics for awhile and now I make myself do that every few months and each time I reassess my technique on synthetics I learn something new and utilize my naturals better. (And I am still far behind the curve compared to Otto and many others!)

    One thing I will say is that we, those of us who go through a lot of naturals, often times take chances when we buy a new stone or 12. You can get around this, to a large extent, by getting a used and known stone on BST, when and if the time comes. Often times the right Aoto or Monzen, etc can give you a very decent working kasumi for a very fair price. Just something to keep in mind for the future.
    I've got what you said stored away in my mind.I admit,getting into naturals scare me because they seem so complicated and expensive at this point in my rather short sharpening career as a retired old fart.Although I am much interested in trying a few naturals,I wouldn't know where to start.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt173 View Post
    I've got what you said stored away in my mind.I admit,getting into naturals scare me because they seem so complicated and expensive at this point in my rather short sharpening career as a retired old fart.Although I am much interested in trying a few naturals,I wouldn't know where to start.
    Nah, they are just rocks so don't be intimidated! Yes, they are different and require a slightly modified technique at times but they are rocks nonetheless. You can normally resell/trade them without losing much too. I am a gambler so I get my stones inexpensively, typically. But again, all in due time!
    -Kit

  10. #30
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grunt173 View Post
    That's beautiful.I sure would like to be able to do that.The King 1000 is the lowest stone I was using to try and achieve the contrast,However,I do have a Gesshin 400 but with that said,I tried thinning with a Shapton Pro 320 which is the lowest stone that I do have without digging out my DMT 220,which gives me goose bumps every time I think about it.
    Ok well just set the blade road up with the Gesshin 400. The Gesshin gets muddy which is nice because once you get a nice even scratch pattern as a base you can lighten pressure to achieve consistent results in any lower spots you might have remaining. Then step up to the king 800 get some mud going and play around in that with light pressure until you have an even appearance. Then just sharpen the edge as per usual. Post pics when done!


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