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Thread: Seeking advice

  1. #1

    Seeking advice

    New to this forum. Am shopping for a new chef's knife. Not absolutely new to them (have had some decent ones) but not an enthusiast like some on this forum.

    Have had a Global G-2 and found the handle too small for my hands (though liked the way it cut). Have had a Wusthoff Classic and wasn't that impressed. Recently bought the new Henckels Twin Profection since a review indicated it was ground at 15 degree bevel, which is not the case. Was not impressed. Sent it back to Cutleryandmore where I got it (they were good about the return, considering I had used the knife for over a month and had sharpened it). So at the moment I'm back to my old Forschner's, which is a decent knife, but not something impressive (except its quality at THAT price).

    So now I'm back in the market. I would prefer something with a Japanese bevel and would like to use my credit with cutleryandmore, so that limits my options. The current contenders are the new Zwilling Bob Kramer carbon steel 8" or 10" (think I want to go bigger this time); the 10" Kasumi; and the 9.5" Mac Professional. Chad Ward loves the MAC and has reservations about carbon steel. I've handled and cut with the Bob Kramer in a SLT and was mighty impressed.

    So my question is this: should I share those reservations? Is the MAC a safer choice? I know the Kramer is going to need extra attention, but will the edge suffer from increasing microrusting? And as for the MAC, I'm thinking: do I really need a knife better than what Thomas Keller uses :-) Anyone use the Kasumi Damascus?

    Thoughts appreciated.

  2. #2
    If you like the Zwilling Kramer, and can afford it, get it! If you've handled a knife you really liked, just buy that one. No need to hunt around.

  3. #3
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    That's sound advice but I also think there is something special about wielding a lighter knife.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    That's sound advice but I also think there is something special about wielding a lighter knife.
    I agree. I found the Zwilling Kramer quite light, in sharp contrast to the Shun Kramer, which they also had. Haven't handled a MAC in some time, so I kinda want to refresh my memory. Don't have a SLT where I live but am traveling to Seattle next week, and they do. There's also Epicurean Edge there

  5. #5
    I have a Zwilling Kramer and I like it a lot. It is pretty well behaved compared to some other carbon knives. It is big compared to most other j-knives, but it isn't heavy. I find the blade to be quite nimble. I would also strongly suggest the 10" as opposed to the 8". I think the 8" is too short for it's heel height, and if you rock at all you will be swinging your arm through a big arc to get the heel up over product while keeping the tip on the board. The 10" gives you extra length to keep the knife angle shallower.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #6
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Having never handled a Z-BK, i'm going based purely on recommendations of others here, but I say get the Kramer. You already like it and if you feel the need to pull a stainless knife, you have your Global (which cuts well, and has almost zero rust capabilities, it seems).
    Go carbon and let us know how much you end up loving the patina and little bit of extra attention you have to pay to the knife.
    I love carbon, but I pull a stainless blade a fair bit on my lazy nights. With that being said, my next blade wil likely be another carbon, which will likely tip the scales in that direction as far as my collection is concerned.
    09/06

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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Having never handled a Z-BK, i'm going based purely on recommendations of others here, but I say get the Kramer. You already like it and if you feel the need to pull a stainless knife, you have your Global (which cuts well, and has almost zero rust capabilities, it seems).
    Go carbon and let us know how much you end up loving the patina and little bit of extra attention you have to pay to the knife.
    I love carbon, but I pull a stainless blade a fair bit on my lazy nights. With that being said, my next blade wil likely be another carbon, which will likely tip the scales in that direction as far as my collection is concerned.
    As carbon steel knife users, do either of you guys ever oil your knives to protect them against rust? I've heard some ppl do this. Just curious. Not sure why carbon makes me nervous. I NEVER leave knifes unwashed and undried in my kitchen, and I have carbon steel pans (de Buyer) that I have no trouble keeping rust free. I guess I have Chad Ward's concerns in the back of my mind. But the Zwilling Kramer is VERY nice. Somewhere else on this forum, I read a thread by a custom Kramer owner who bought the Zwilling and could not detect any significant difference. That's impressive!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Having never handled a Z-BK, i'm going based purely on recommendations of others here, but I say get the Kramer. You already like it and if you feel the need to pull a stainless knife, you have your Global (which cuts well, and has almost zero rust capabilities, it seems).
    Go carbon and let us know how much you end up loving the patina and little bit of extra attention you have to pay to the knife.
    I love carbon, but I pull a stainless blade a fair bit on my lazy nights. With that being said, my next blade wil likely be another carbon, which will likely tip the scales in that direction as far as my collection is concerned.
    Actually, gave the Global to a friend! But if I'm in a context of possible knife abuse (e.g., visiting cooks!), then I can pull out the Forschner!

    I do wish Global would make knives for someone besides Japanese housewives. I need a man-sized handle!

  9. #9
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Cutleryandmore has the Cermax on clearance....
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  10. #10
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    Extra care means wiping with a damp cloth periodically during a cutting session and then adding a dry cloth to the ritual if you're going to pause for some reason. The slower you are at cutting, the more wiping you're going to need to make. It also depends on the knife and the development of a patina but you'll figure that out as you get to know your knife. As for oiling, that's unnecessary unless you aren't going to be using it for a long time or you live in Hawaii, for example.

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