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Thread: Kippington workhorse honyaki pass around

  1. #161
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    I love sharpening the workhorse, looking forward to testing the laser.


  2. #162
    Senior Member panda's Avatar
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    here is laser choil


  3. #163
    Senior Member McMan's Avatar
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    ^^ Proper!

  4. #164
    Senior Member panda's Avatar
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    it's actually about same spine thickness as my marko, just ground much thinner, you can see the concavity starts very high up the blade, like a reverse convex.

    i do prefer the WH, but as far as lasers go, this one is da best, aint nothing better for thin cuts.

    also kip, what ever heat treat you did on the laser, you should stick to that regiment, it's pretty dope. two other knife nuts i've let try it have both complimented on its springiness and how much they liked it.

  5. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post


    it's actually about same spine thickness as my marko, just ground much thinner, you can see the concavity starts very high up the blade, like a reverse convex.

    i do prefer the WH, but as far as lasers go, this one is da best, aint nothing better for thin cuts.

    also kip, what ever heat treat you did on the laser, you should stick to that regiment, it's pretty dope. two other knife nuts i've let try it have both complimented on its springiness and how much they liked it.
    How do you all tell the difference of heat treatment? Like what defines it in how it’s used/feel?

  6. #166
    Senior Member panda's Avatar
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    i'm just overly sensitive to how it feels while in use. what i say comes out as exaggerated when in reality is extremely subtle differences. but to me that 1% difference resonates with me.

  7. #167
    Kippington's Avatar
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    Thanks for the choil shots of the laser, it looks to be in good shape.

    In regards to the differing HT, I'd hate to get all technical (pfft! ) but the elasticity of steel is pretty much constant regardless of HT - So because the laser is ground thinner over the workhorse, the thicker workhorse will naturally feel more solid (although I ground the tip on that to be thin as well), the laser springier... and there's practically nothing I can do to change it.

    Here's a different way of thinking of it: Many of us have seen videos out there of great bladesmiths displaying the strength and tenacity of their heat-treatment by locking their blade vertically in a vice and bending it 90 degrees without having it crack or delaminate:



    Yet if you took a cheap filleting knife, there would be no issue at all in passing the same test due to how thin it is:



    A workhorse style knife would feel like a crowbar in comparison to the springy laser. There's no way around it, not without beating physics anyway.
    In regards to the passaround, I think that the double concave thin-behind-the-edge knife feels awesome! It has a whispy feeling on the stones and a glidey feeling on the board, hard to describe but it feels great! I've always been a laser fanboy though...
    There's a bird on your shoulder.

  8. #168
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    So what happens when you heat-treat a spring?

  9. #169
    Kippington's Avatar
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    We would need to HT a spring if one-of-two problems occur:
    1. It's too soft and will plasticity deform (i.e bends in a way that it can't return back to its original shape) or...
    2. It's too hard and cracks when a load is applied.
    For these reasons, Plasticine and glass would make terrible springs.

    If these two points aren't an issue, we can depend on the constant elasticity of steel to do the springy work for us. The elasticity is adjustable not by HT, but by changing the dimensions of the spring... or in the case of kitchen knives, the grind.



    Spring steels can make really good knives!

    There's a bird on your shoulder.

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