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How to sharpen 90/10 Honesuki?
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Thread: How to sharpen 90/10 Honesuki?

  1. #1

    How to sharpen 90/10 Honesuki?

    Ok so i have a tojiro honesuki 150mm and it has a 90/10 angle on it, i know this sounds dumb however i have never sharpened this bevel myself.

    I know the angle is approx. 16 on the right side, although to me it seem as if the left side should remain flat on the stone as if i was sharpening a single bevel, is this correct?

    Or should i do the same 16 or so angle on the back side and just a few strokes?

  2. #2
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    Most honesuki are not true single bevel knives and the Tojiro certainly sits in that camp. Sharpen the large bevel and then deburr on the back side at a normal angle.

  3. #3
    Ok so when deburing on the back normal being 16 or whatever angle i am sharpening at on the front side? Also just do light pressure and a few strokes?

  4. #4
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    On the front side is where you are doing most of your sharpening. I'd recommend following the bevels that are already there with a marker. If you don't have chipping problems, you can adjust your front angle up or down, as desired. The back side, would just be a very small 15 deg bevel. At some point, you'll have to thin by working the large secondary bevel on the front side.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    i spent a long time thinning out the bevel on my old misono honesuki. after what seemed like endless hours, i was able to get it thinned out enough that i felt like it achieved its potential. i for one do not like those steep bevels they put on the hankotsu and honesuki. for me, a major thinning behind the edge worked but i cannot say the value of the knife was worth the blood from sharpening the skin off my middle finger
    It's like my ol' grandpappy used to say; "The less one makes declarative statements, the less apt he is to look a fool in retrospect"

  6. #6
    I'm not very familiar with single bevel knives, i believe from watching and reading that you lay it flat on the large bevel, and lift up slight more to hit the edge itself. So for thinning i would imagine that i only use the large bevel?

    I could be entirely off but I'm pretty sure if not correct me.

    Also it seems pretty thin behind the edge for how thick the blade is, although i would like to thin it a little bit while I'm sharpening it coming up here. Also microbevel a good idea or bad idea for this type of knife?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgraeff View Post
    I'm not very familiar with single bevel knives, i believe from watching and reading that you lay it flat on the large bevel, and lift up slight more to hit the edge itself. So for thinning i would imagine that i only use the large bevel?

    I could be entirely off but I'm pretty sure if not correct me.

    Also it seems pretty thin behind the edge for how thick the blade is, although i would like to thin it a little bit while I'm sharpening it coming up here. Also microbevel a good idea or bad idea for this type of knife?
    Not quite for the single bevel knives. It always sharpening from the shinogi line down, then lifting up VERY slightly, sharpening till you hit the edge, then blending the two angles, and doing the back. Honesuki is almost never a true single bevel knife... even the nenohi (there are a couple exceptions that come to mind). 99% of honesuki are double bevel knives with extreme asymmetry. I do not recommend thinning them... they are meant to be tough knives and when you see them used as they were intended to be used, it makes a lot of sense why they are that thick. Microbevels may also be a good idea depending on the steel and your use.




  8. #8
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    The Tojiro DP honesuki is not really a single bevel knife. Sharpen it like a double bevel knife because that is what it is. When it gets thick behind the edge, you can use the large bevel only to thin it. You can also thin it by lowering the angles on the primary edge bevels (but as Jon stated, it's meant for some bone/board contact). I wouldn't put a micro on it unless it was chipping. It really just depends on your use and the angle you're grinding your bevels at.
    Last edited by tk59; 11-16-2011 at 07:55 PM. Reason: jon beat me to the punch

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    Those vids are mesmerizing!
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  10. #10
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    I messed up on this style of knife at first as well. Somewhere along the line I had lost my way with this knife. Over time I was laying the back side down too flat almost like a true single bevel. Couldn't figure out why deburring was so difficult or why I couldn't attain my original sharpness. Sent it to Dave and he fixed her up along with a new handle to boot.

    After I got her back I was able to see clearly what Dave had done and I've been on the right path ever since. Sharpen the edge on the front from the bevel down to the edge, deburr at about a regular angle on the back. No problems and thanks Dave.
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