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Thread: Burn Remedies?

  1. #31
    Actually here is a more accurate classification of burns, the one I gave was a quick and dirty version but not exactly perfect, so here is a more detailed one:

    http://www.burnsurvivorsttw.org/burns/degree.html

  2. #32
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olpappy View Post
    ...1/2nd degree burns, if possible apply ice as soon as possible. This will stop the burn damage from worsening and reduce inflammation. In some cases it can minimize or avoid blistering....
    The Mayo Clinic link I provided above specifically says not to apply ice to 1st or 2nd degree burns:
    Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cool water or cool it with cold compresses. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don't put ice on the burn.
    Comment?
    Doug Collins
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  3. #33
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olpappy View Post
    Sorry to be late to this thread. I am a medical doctor, I will give you the straight scoop as simply as possible. Burns are classified as follows:}

    1st degree - redness, no blistering
    2nd degree - blistering of skin
    3rd degree - damage to underlying muscle and tissue

    Most burns of 1st and 2nd degree can be treated out of hospital, 3rd degree you go to a burn unit. 1/2nd degree burns, if possible apply ice as soon as possible. This will stop the burn damage from worsening and reduce inflammation. In some cases it can minimize or avoid blistering.

    Don't worry too much about OTC creams and stuff, they won't make much difference. Aloe (sap of the actual cactus plant) can help somewhat for minor 1st degree burns, don't know how much of it if any is in those creams they sell.

    Silver sulfadiazine (Silvadene) is for burns that blister and peel. Once the skin is broken it is vulnerable to infection, the Silvadene has antibacterial properties to prevent infection. Usually the area is covered with gauze to facilitate cleaning and hygiene. 1st degree burns you can take care of at home, 2nd degree burns it's just easier to go to your Dr's office and have the staff there clean and dress it. Also, if the injury occurred at work, it will help to have medical records documenting the injury for purposes of Workman's Compensation.
    Working with hot steel I have had all three.
    Fortunately I have had only one third degree burn and it was really more of a 2.5 seriuos damage to skin, charring actually, but only minor damage to underlying tissue. No skin graft necessary. The wierd thing was I had very little pain, the second wierd thing was my Doc gave me a tetanus shot. Dressed it with silvadine and prescribed me more.
    This is what I do for burns
    First degree-ignore them
    Second degree-keep clean and dry, bandage and then ignore them.
    Third degree-go see a Doc and get treatment(I'm not a total idiot)

    I don't necessarily recommend this for everyone else(except for the third-yeah go and see a doc) but I'm like the opposite of a hypochondriac (my little sister is one she goes more times in one year than I have been in my entire life-including being born)

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
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    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Delbert Ealy View Post
    Working with hot steel I have had all three.
    Fortunately I have had only one third degree burn and it was really more of a 2.5 seriuos damage to skin, charring actually, but only minor damage to underlying tissue.

    This is what I do for burns
    First degree-ignore them
    Second degree-keep clean and dry, bandage and then ignore them.
    Third degree-go see a Doc and get treatment(I'm not a total idiot)
    Wow lots of erm...interesting stuff

    Ice...no ice...water....keep dry????

    I'm now more confused

    But my prize for best response goes to - Delbert

    at least you raised a smile.....

    When I read the last line of your sig ........it kinda put it all in context

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by FryBoy View Post
    The Mayo Clinic link I provided above specifically says not to apply ice to 1st or 2nd degree burns:
    Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. If this is impractical, immerse the burn in cool water or cool it with cold compresses. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don't put ice on the burn.
    Comment?

    Hmm, I don't know why they say that. Ice will conduct heat away, reduce inflammation and relieve pain more effectively than cool water. Maybe they are worried about an open wound becoming infected, or damage to the skin from becoming too cold. If you apply say, a can of frozen juice directly to the skin you can get a mini freeze burn. Ask me how I know this? So use a towel to insulate the ice pack from the skin.

    What I'm saying here may not be the universally accepted medical opinion, but I'm saying it because I know it works. If you have a bad burn, cool water isn't going to make you feel a whole lot better, because it's just not cold enough.

    How well does it work? To me, the results are almost miraculous. Ice kept my would-be 2nd degree burn limited to just a 1st degree burn. Once long ago I was using a propane torch to heat a knife tang and for some reason the nozzle suddenly popped off. Without thinking, I automatically reached down to pick it up. Well, I ran inside to get ice as fast as I could because I could almost feel an instant blister starting on my thumb. I kept ice on there until the pain level went down, which took about 6 hrs. I pretty much used every frozen item in the freezer during that time. But the next day it never developed a blister and the skin didn't peel.

    Another time a family came to see me with their teenage daughter who had a really severe sunburn, she had gone on a boat and been on the ocean all day. Her whole torso was badly sunburned. I told them to use ice, the next day they came back and thanked me. If people come back to say thanks, that tells me it worked really well.

    Creams, Tylenol, ibuprofen etc are not very effective, but ice is fantastic. Much more effective than any other thing you can do.

  6. #36
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olpappy View Post
    Hmm, I don't know why they say that. Ice will conduct heat away, reduce inflammation and relieve pain more effectively than cool water. Maybe they are worried about an open wound becoming infected, or damage to the skin from becoming too cold. If you apply say, a can of frozen juice directly to the skin you can get a mini freeze burn. Ask me how I know this? So use a towel to insulate the ice pack from the skin.

    What I'm saying here may not be the universally accepted medical opinion, but I'm saying it because I know it works. If you have a bad burn, cool water isn't going to make you feel a whole lot better, because it's just not cold enough.

    How well does it work? To me, the results are almost miraculous. Ice kept my would-be 2nd degree burn limited to just a 1st degree burn. Once long ago I was using a propane torch to heat a knife tang and for some reason the nozzle suddenly popped off. Without thinking, I automatically reached down to pick it up. Well, I ran inside to get ice as fast as I could because I could almost feel an instant blister starting on my thumb. I kept ice on there until the pain level went down, which took about 6 hrs. I pretty much used every frozen item in the freezer during that time. But the next day it never developed a blister and the skin didn't peel.

    Another time a family came to see me with their teenage daughter who had a really severe sunburn, she had gone on a boat and been on the ocean all day. Her whole torso was badly sunburned. I told them to use ice, the next day they came back and thanked me. If people come back to say thanks, that tells me it worked really well.

    Creams, Tylenol, ibuprofen etc are not very effective, but ice is fantastic. Much more effective than any other thing you can do.
    KEEP THE ICE OFF OF IT!

    Ice/ice water is no more effective than a placebo and can severely damage the skin, cause mild frostbite and slow down the healing process. Ice/ice water can also drastically increase levels of pain. Your hand may feel numb while it's in there but once you take it out the pain levels skyrocket into the stratosphere. You'd be better off having done nothing at all than using ice. Cool water is the most effective at drawing the heat out of a burn. Trust me on this one Doc.

    Ive been burned by flat top griddles, oven doors, oven racks, sheet pans, open flames, grease fires, fryer oil, saute pans, smoking hot sizzle plates, heat lamp coils, boiling water, steam machines, caramelized sugar, exploding butane cans, napalm like grizzle on the soft part of your wrist while you're holding a plate for the chef as he's taking his sweet ass time saucing and using his tweezers to strategically place a few delicate pieces of micro greens all the while that nasty fresh off the ripping hot 1200 degree grill piece of fatty grizzle is just sitting there on your milky supple wrist just digging it's way further into your flesh and you can't drop the plate cause if that $65 steak hits the deck your ass is grass so you just sit there and take that **** like a man etc etc infinity.

    Take it from my own professional experience as the king of all burns, KEEP THE ICE OFF OF IT!
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  7. #37
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    Sorry, ThEoRy, but my experience backs up olpappy's advice. Ice works, and works well.

  8. #38
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    We'll have to agree to disagree here. Ice has caused me nothing but excessive pain and problems.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    We'll have to agree to disagree here. Ice has caused me nothing but excessive pain and problems.
    Perhaps it's the type of burn that determines how the ice treatment works. The last burn of any consequence I gave myself was when I grabbed the handle of a skillet that had just come out of a 450 degree oven. I immediately took a handful of ice and held it in my palm for about fifteen minutes. I really expected some blisters and pain, and a slow healing process as it was my palm that had taken the hit. But that never happened. I had a couple of small blisters and overall redness the next day, but to my surprise, not much pain. Healing seemed to be quicker. I think it probably had to do with quickly cooling the burn.

    I guess I've been lucky enough not to have gotten a bad burn from oil/grease or sugar, yet.

  10. #40
    ThEoRy, it sounds like you have a lot more experience with getting burned than anyone I know. Can you explain in more detail what was your experience when you used ice, what kind of burn was it and what happened?

    When I got burned, yes it would feel numb with ice on it and the pain would return when the ice was removed, but I attributed the pain to the burn injury, not the ice. The only reason I kept ice on it for 6 hrs was because that's how long it took to not have severe pain as soon as the ice was removed. Yes, you do have to use caution not to get the area too cold, you should remove the ice any time you feel the area becoming uncomfortably /excessively cold. But the pain will make you want to put the ice back soon enough, ha ha.

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