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Thread: Prime v. Dry Aged v. Wagyu

  1. #1

    Prime v. Dry Aged v. Wagyu

    What do you prefer? Whenever I go to the butcher shop, I always have a tough time choosing, they have so many cuts in a few great grades that the options are nearly endless.

    My local (chain) butcher shop has Prime, Dry Aged (Top Choice grade) and Wagyu (not sure what grade, most likely "top choice" or ungraded) all for about the same price. For a New York Strip, the Prime is $20.99/lb, the Dry Aged is a bone in Strip and $20.99/lb. They didn't have Wagyu when I was there this past time, but from what I remember, it was around the same price.

    This time around I got one Prime strip and one bone in Dry Aged strip. Each one was about a pound. Dry Aged on the left, Prime on the right:





    The Prime cooks up nicer, partially because it is boneless. The bone in cuts always get a bit tricky as the meat shrinks the parts near the bone don't want to sear nicely on the cast iron pan. I cook my steaks slow in a ton of butter on the stove. These took probably at least 15 minutes, turning and basting frequently. The Dry Aged cut ended up being closer to medium as it was a bit thinner, but not too far over.

    The Dry Aged also has a bit of a gamey flavor, due to it being (basically) slow rotted in a controlled environment. The Dry Aged was also dryer, partially to being cooked more, and partially due to being, well, dryed. The Prime steak had great marbling, and even after drying, the Dry Aged cut couldn't match the Prime's fat content. Overall, the Prime cut was a much better steak.

    Next time I am there, I hope to get the Prime and Wagyu and have those two side by side.

    What are your experiences? What do you prefer?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  2. #2
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    Pork fanatic here... But as I work in a butchery department I have to try everything We sell the heck out of the dry aged stuff all day long. We hang it for 14 days in a windowed control room. Stuff sells it's self lol

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ratton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    I cook my steaks slow in a ton of butter on the stove. These took probably at least 15 minutes, turning and basting frequently.
    Hi JC,

    Can you please explain your theory in cooking a steak this way. Do you sear it on high heat first and then turn the heat down?? I am not familiar with this technique at all!!

    Thanks!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratton View Post
    Hi JC,

    Can you please explain your theory in cooking a steak this way. Do you sear it on high heat first and then turn the heat down?? I am not familiar with this technique at all!!

    Thanks!!!!
    I'm guessing it's similar to this method: http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/27/di...anted=3&src=pm
    The idea is that the butter promotes browning and creates a good crust, without turning the steak to carbon.

  5. #5
    Nope, no high heat at all. Just slow and low. Butter helps with the caramelization. No oven needed either.

    It is not my method, more Alain Ducasse's. Here is an article on egullet where a guy cooks a MONSTER steak this way for 45 minutes. My steaks are never that big, so they don't take nearly as long. I flip mine more frequently than he does as well, but like he says at the end of the article, there are many acceptable variations to this method, and don't let your previous knowledge of steak cookery factor in too much. You don't have to follow those rules with this method to get a great steak.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    I'm guessing it's similar to this method: http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/27/di...anted=3&src=pm
    The idea is that the butter promotes browning and creates a good crust, without turning the steak to carbon.
    Yup, that's the one.

    Just to note: the steak should be reasonably thick however. Around an inch or so and up. If they are too thin the middle overcooks before you get really good color on the outside.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  7. #7

    ecchef's Avatar
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    I'd go dry aged, all things being equal. Not the biggest fan of Wagyu, but I'm more of a chu-toro guy anyway.

    Technique is a variation on a poêlé from what I can gather. Been around for a long time, but usually applied to white meats.

    Now I'm hungry looking at them pics!
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  8. #8
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    I cook my steaks like JC does. I like sneaking up on my desired finishing temperature. I feel like the lower cooking temperature allows the fat in the steak to melt but remain encased in the meat. Whether this is true on not I'm always happy with the juicy results.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Yup, that's the one.

    Just to note: the steak should be reasonably thick however. Around an inch or so and up. If they are too thin the middle overcooks before you get really good color on the outside.
    Very true.

  10. #10
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    I'll have to try this. I would have gone with the dry-aged but I guess I'll have to reconsider.

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