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  1. #1

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    Sharpening Start

    Hello all,

    I'm rather new to the world of cooking, and in particular, knives.

    Nevertheless, I've rapidly acquired an interest and would like to learn how to sharpen my knives.

    After some initial research, I think the following would be sufficient for my current needs.

    King Combination 1K/6K stone + a flattening stone

    http://www.epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=80006
    http://www.straightrazordesigns.com/...plate-220-grit

    Any thoughts, recommendations, or further considerations on a starter sharpening set (higher/lower grit, nagura stone inclusion, etc)?

    I'd like to keep the budget under $100 total if at all possible. Poor college student and all that.

    Thank you,

    -taketori

  2. #2

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    1k and 6k will take of pretty much all your sharpening needs. There are better 1k and 6k stones out there than the King combo, but at a greater cost. The combo should be fine for someone starting out on a budget.

    Most people here use Atoma or DMT plates to flatten their stones. They are more $ than the one you linked, but work much better.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  3. #3

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    Nope. That's a great way to start.

    I'd also get something to deburr into, whether it's a piece of ultra rock hard felt, or a cork, or rubber.

  4. #4
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    Great recommendations, but I would also invest in a therapist to counsel you on potential addiction issues to come. Just kidding....sort of.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  5. #5
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    That's a nice starter set and you shouldn't really ever need to upgrade. You just won't be cool, lol.

  6. #6
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    That's a nice starter set and you shouldn't really ever need to upgrade. You just won't be cool, lol.
    Agreed on both counts.

  7. #7
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    The King stones are more than capable. I think you need to work them a lot harder than the more popular stones, but I think that is good if you're starting out. You'll get great edges off the Kings then when you upgrade your edges will be better than you thought possible

  8. #8
    Senior Member eto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taketori View Post
    Hello all,

    I'm rather new to the world of cooking, and in particular, knives.

    Nevertheless, I've rapidly acquired an interest and would like to learn how to sharpen my knives.

    After some initial research, I think the following would be sufficient for my current needs.

    King Combination 1K/6K stone + a flattening stone

    http://www.epicedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=80006
    http://www.straightrazordesigns.com/...plate-220-grit

    Any thoughts, recommendations, or further considerations on a starter sharpening set (higher/lower grit, nagura stone inclusion, etc)?

    I'd like to keep the budget under $100 total if at all possible. Poor college student and all that.

    Thank you,

    -taketori
    Those will due you justice for a long time.

  9. #9
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    99Limited's Avatar
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    On your quest to remain frugal, go to Home Depot, Lowe's or a local hardware store and buy a packet of the coarsest drywall sanding screens. You can also order them from Amazon. Also pick up a piece of 12x12 ceramic tile. Make sure the exposed surface that's to be used is flat, not something with patterns or little dimples. If you can pick up a scrap piece of granite or marble that would work too. You then use this to flatten your sharpening stones. Place the tile/granite on your counter top. Lay the drywall screen on that, add some water for lubrication and then rub your stone on that until it's flat. If this doesn't make sense, there are some youtube videos that show you how it's done.

    A lot of people use this setup when they first get started. It's cheap and it works.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Citizen Snips's Avatar
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    i dont have a problem with king stones, but you should always steer away from combination stones. they have a cheaper feel to me. just grab a king 1k and a king 6k or better yet, pick up a bester 1200 and learn on that. teaching yourself one stone at a time is a good way to start learning. you could go with two but the key is learning fundamentals, not worrying about what grits and makers you want to get.
    It's like my ol' grandpappy used to say; "The less one makes declarative statements, the less apt he is to look a fool in retrospect"

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