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How to remove scratches and polish knifes after thinning?
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Thread: How to remove scratches and polish knifes after thinning?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    How to remove scratches and polish knifes after thinning?

    I thinned and convexed my kino HD but it is all scratched up now. The performance is awesome however I hate the look of it now. I like things to look nice.

    Any ideas on how to fix this? Tried to polish it up on my natural it removes some but it just looks uneven will try to post some pics.

  2. #2

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    sandpaper. 3m wet/dry, in assorted grits. lubricant will help to create a haze if scratch marks are bothering you.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Just meant as an addition: experiment with sandpaper + mud from your stones.

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    Lubricant as in water? Also do I need to go in one direction only?

  5. #5
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    One direction only will make the finish more even, and lubricant as in water + a drop or two of Dawn detergent.

  6. #6

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    I use mineral oil, but anything that suspends swarf works.

    I think unidirectional strokes makes an even finish

  7. #7
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    A complete scratches removal would require refinishing the whole blade. It can be done on a grinder (machine finish) or by hand (hand-rubbed finish).

    To do it by hand, you would need to remove a handle (it is fairly easy to knock off a handle), and if you don't have a vise, but have some old work bench, you can screw a piece of wood to it (got to sink the screws deep), with at least a couple of inches hanging over the edge of the bench. You will clamp your knife's tang with a C-Clamp to overhanging section of the wood. Some guys line the wood with leather or some other cushion, to make sure the blade lays flat while you apply pressure on it. I cover the wood section with a plastic tape, so I can clean it up easily from sanding slurry (removed metal and Windex lubricant)

    You will need a sanding stick or sorts. It should be about 12" long, or long enough that you can hold it with two hands. Pad the bottom of the stick (3 inch section or so) with a piece of leather or cork gasket material. This will create a cushion to "hug" a shape of your knife.

    Cut a strip of sandpaper as wide as your cushioned area, wrap it around, and sand your knife with back-and-forth motion. As you use up the paper, move it up, so you have a fresh area to sand with. You can pick an assorted pack from your local automotive supply shop. I use 3M Emperial.

    You need to spray the knife and paper periodically to reduce loading. I prefer Windex over water or WD40.

    If you thinned your knife with DMT XXC, start with 220 or 320 and then move to 400 and finish your blade with 600 grit removing scratches of the previous grit, before moving onto next. Up to the last finishing grit, you can sand with a back-and-forth motion. Once you get to your last few passes on your finishing grit, sand in one direction only, tang to a tip, one pass per new exposed area of your paper. This will put down finishing scratches.

    Paper should cost your around $5 and you need only one sheet of each grit.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    It can be very tricky. Sometimes you get scratches in weird places from low grit that you missed that are a PITA. I use a 4000 grit micromesh paid with 5k stone slurry which works quite well

  9. #9
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    I'm a little nervous about taking the handle off gonna try without removing it.

    Gonna go to Walmart tonight what grits shall I use? I started my thinning with a 400 gesshin, then 1k, 6k, and takashima.

    If I can't get it anyone willing to do it if I ship it out? Should be getting another knife soon anyways.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    My question is why did you want to thin a kono hd? Mine's pretty freaking thin to begin with.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

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