Quantcast
Mid-Tech? - Page 3
+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 82

Thread: Mid-Tech?

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    750
    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Yeah, I think transparency goes a long way. For me, "custom" means it was made to specs--that's it. "Handmade" means that the characteristic features were guided/crafted/shaped using manually controlled tools. "Mid-Tech" means "I am a custom artisan knifemaker and am not doing my normal thing with these, but I am guaranteeing them with my name".
    That's my definition too!!

  2. #22

    PierreRodrigue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,772
    Eamon, that is the heart of the issue. I know that Devin, Bill, myself, have debated the pros and cons of even considering midtechs, and I talked with both actually, about the possible cons to doing them. We all have our worries, and reasons for wanting to do them. For me, it is a way to get a top quality product, that I am willing to back with my name on each and every one, available faster, and in higher quantities, to more people then ever possible from my own "custom shop", at a much better price point.

    What does all that really mean? By hand only, I buy a sheet of steel, layout a bunch of profiles one at a time, cut them out, clean the profile, HT, grind, finish, handle, brand etc. As a mid-tech, I can get the cut, HT'ed, partially ground faster and way cheaper than I could ever hope to do it. I might be able to cut out 6 in an hour, another hour to profile, then HT two or three at a time, where industry can cut out 50 in 20 mins, HT and rough grind in a small percentage of the time I would take, and be more consistant! Then I finish, handle, clean up and inspect/test. A customer buys a custom from me. He gets the best I can give him. Same customer buys a "Professional Series" mid-tech knife, He is still getting the same steel, the same HT, with the tedious time consuming tasks done by industry, at a lesser price, just not one of a kind, and not all done by hand. As far as performance goes, you will not be able to tell them apart. For someone who wants a one of a kind by "MAKER" he will still go custom. For someone who would like a "MAKERS" knife, but has a hard time justifying cost, he now has an option.

    Look at is like buying a print from an artist. You buy the origional, you pay the price. You buy a numbered print, you still get to enjoy the art, but it costs much less.

    My thoughts...


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  3. #23

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Top of Georgia
    Posts
    1,218
    Based on your example Pierre, I'd rather have the mid-tech knife than the custom. It has more added value.

    -AJ

  4. #24
    Pabloz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Based on your example Pierre, I'd rather have the mid-tech knife than the custom. It has more added value.

    -AJ
    +1... and it really is significantly more than a "numbered print."

  5. #25

    PierreRodrigue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,772
    In my eye, it is a great option. There will always be the guy who wants Mr Makers custom, the way he wants it to look, with the materials he selects, that you can't buy any where else. And there will always be the guy who wants a great performing knife, that will be better than the latest German or French knife, but chooses for whatever reason, to not spend full custom money, and is happy with a mid-tech option. One will not replace the other, and there is room for both, I think.


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  6. #26
    Pabloz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    353
    Yes sir! Custom options/upgrades are always available.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Near Seattle, WA
    Posts
    290
    Oh yeah. This one drives me crazy. The best advice I got on this topic was from Chuck Bybee (Alpha knife supply) because I was confused with what to call a line of knifes I wanted to eventually have water-jet cut and commercially heat-treated. He said that I should make the knife, describe exactly what I did and what was done elsewhere and that is it. You guys can call it whatever the hell you want!!

    I mean, in my forged integral knives that I call "custom" and put my M.S. stamp on: a) I didn't smelt or roll the steel b) I didn't actually grow and process the wood for the handle c) I didn't even stabilize it myself d) I didn't create the epoxy from pitch and gum in my backyard e) I didn't create my own finishing oils. So where do we draw the line? I don't know, they are just words and labels and don't mean a damn thing anymore. I agree with some of you above in that just be honest about what you did and we can all call it like we see it.

    -M

  8. #28

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,028
    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    Eamon, that is the heart of the issue. I know that Devin, Bill, myself, have debated the pros and cons of even considering midtechs, and I talked with both actually, about the possible cons to doing them. We all have our worries, and reasons for wanting to do them. For me, it is a way to get a top quality product, that I am willing to back with my name on each and every one, available faster, and in higher quantities, to more people then ever possible from my own "custom shop", at a much better price point.

    What does all that really mean? By hand only, I buy a sheet of steel, layout a bunch of profiles one at a time, cut them out, clean the profile, HT, grind, finish, handle, brand etc. As a mid-tech, I can get the cut, HT'ed, partially ground faster and way cheaper than I could ever hope to do it. I might be able to cut out 6 in an hour, another hour to profile, then HT two or three at a time, where industry can cut out 50 in 20 mins, HT and rough grind in a small percentage of the time I would take, and be more consistant! Then I finish, handle, clean up and inspect/test. A customer buys a custom from me. He gets the best I can give him. Same customer buys a "Professional Series" mid-tech knife, He is still getting the same steel, the same HT, with the tedious time consuming tasks done by industry, at a lesser price, just not one of a kind, and not all done by hand. As far as performance goes, you will not be able to tell them apart. For someone who wants a one of a kind by "MAKER" he will still go custom. For someone who would like a "MAKERS" knife, but has a hard time justifying cost, he now has an option.

    Look at is like buying a print from an artist. You buy the origional, you pay the price. You buy a numbered print, you still get to enjoy the art, but it costs much less.

    My thoughts...
    I like this example/reasoning/definition. The only issue that arises is when makers are not transparent with what processes are done in their hands and which are done in a factory by a machine. If someone wanted to have a knife completely made by a factory with just their name on it (a la Zwilling Kramer) and call it mid-tech, I am fine with that as long as they are telling us that is what they are doing.

    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    In my eye, it is a great option. There will always be the guy who wants Mr Makers custom, the way he wants it to look, with the materials he selects, that you can't buy any where else. And there will always be the guy who wants a great performing knife, that will be better than the latest German or French knife, but chooses for whatever reason, to not spend full custom money, and is happy with a mid-tech option. One will not replace the other, and there is room for both, I think.
    That is the question, is there room for both. I have a DT ITK and would still want a DT custom, even more so than I did before I owned the ITK. Same goes for the Zwilling Kramer. So not only will you be able to sell to different markets, you will also have some people who start with a mid tech of yours, hopefully love it, and some day upgrade to a full custom.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  9. #29

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    3,028
    Quote Originally Posted by RRLOVER View Post
    I am not confused nor do I think it's a bad thing.I was trying to find out were the name came from.The reply from Marko gave me the answer.I guess all my knives will be mid tech for a while.
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I understand why you put up the question but I don't honestly think you need to call it a mid-tech. You made it. It's an RRLOVER knife. I was giving you my point of view as a potential customer: I want to know what I'm paying for when I make my decision. That's all.
    I agree with TK. If I call you up and ask you for a gyuto, you have the ability to ask me what size, profile, handle material, steel, etc. It is full custom, exactly to my specs. You made it from start to finish (or close to it) with me in mind. You get all of your knives heat treated by someone else. You aren't heat treating some yourself, and farming out others. Not every maker is going to do a full heat treat with every steel available to him in house. Doesn't mean I didn't get a custom knife from them.

    For me, mid-tech means "off the shelf". How much of each is made by the maker, is up to him and for him to hopefully disclose. Custom is made to order.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  10. #30
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    4,092
    So, where does a factory made/production knife fit in if everything is lumped into mid-tech category? The line starts getting blurry. Maybe there should be three categories: low-tech (factory knife - most processes farmed out), mid tech (some processes farmed out), and 100% sole authorship.

    I go by Ken Onion (original) definition of mid-tech.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts