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Thread: which steel

  1. #1
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    which steel

    I didn't think I'd ever ask this ... My dad enjoys using his T-I Sabatier and I want to get him a nice steel for Christmas. He's currently using a zwilling 10" steel. I'm thinking something in the 12" range would be better for his 10" knife. I am looking at f.dick but I don't really know what the difference is between their lines.

  2. #2
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    Depending on what your budget is I've really enjoyed using fine ceramic or glass hones... though given the softer steel in the sab, any finely grooved, or polished steel would work well. In my experience, pro kitchens, and for me in general longer is better.

  3. #3
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    I'd go for glass. I love mine but it might not do well if you're not careful. It is glass, after all...

  4. #4
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    Never used a glass rod; the ceramic fine is really perfect for my T-I/Nogent Sabs, though. I suppose in theory they remove bits of metal (not much, but more than the glass rods). I can't see this mattering in any but a good way.

    THose with experience with both could tell you more than I; I will say that a longer ceramic rod (if the knives are 10", then a 12" rod) makes sense. Those knives respond SO well to "steeling".... I'd be ok with moving toward a polished steel, or (I'm sure) a (more expensive) glass rod as well. But fear not the fine ceramic. Those knives won't keep a super-high polish anyway.

  5. #5
    A couple of days ago I saw a glestain octagon steel made from ceramic, it seemed like the theory behind it makes sense. I am not recommending BTW but if I were to get one that would be it just out of curiosity and logic.

  6. #6
    I love the way my 1200 grit ceramic honing rod performs on soft carbon steel. I suggest one of those...I think mine is from Hand American?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    If your father is used to the aggressive edge a conventional steel leaves I'm not sure he will like the more polished result of steeling with a fine ceramic rod. Otherwise the black MAC (J2000) would be my suggestion.

  8. #8
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    I gave him a ceramic rod a year ago, it's a DMT DMCS2 (7 micron / 2200 mesh). It leaves a very coarse scratch pattern almost coarser than a Beston 500! If the MAC provides a different result I might be interested in that for him.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Even with softer steels I've noticed almost no abrasion.

  10. #10
    Idahone! That's who makes the one I use. It's great, and not remotely a polisher. It leaves a scratch pattern duller than my Shapton GS 500. But I wouldn't have it any other way. I made a knife from a machete blade(some cheapo crap carbon steel) and once the edge bevel was cut in, the steel is soft enough to be kept up solely with this thing, and it cuts pretty dang good. If people have Sabatiers, Wusthofs, Henckels, Chicago Cutlery, etc, and want improvement for less than $100, I suggest they just buy an Idahone rod and keep up with them on it, especially the easy-to-abrade carbon steels.

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