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Thread: Got Sharpening Questions?

  1. #41
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Nice illustration TB!
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  2. #42
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by TB_London View Post
    Stolen from another forum:


    That's a big bevel. Not as big as the one on my CarboNext, but close.

  3. #43

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    actually, when you use sharpie you want to color in the bevel AND a little of the area behind the bevel. That way you can see when your angle is way too low and when you are scratching the area behind the edge. You'd be surprised at how often this kind of thing happens.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    On honing, i dont like honing rods at all. Their main purpose is to bend the edge back into place. Bending metal over and over again can cause fatigue. So using honing rods will straighten out your edge and also weaken it at the same time. Anyone who's used one knows that you end up having to go back to the rod more and more often once you start using it. This is not to say there isnt a time and place for honing rods, i just prefer to spend 5 minutes on a stone and get a clean sharp edge that lasts a much longer time.

    Quick question... what kind of damage do you think would occur from using the actual angle of the edge? You'd be surprised at how quickly stones can grind something like that off. Plus, you can always begin your stroke with an edge trailing motion just to be sure.
    Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions John. I really appreciate it.

    The damage would be from grinding off that bent part, instead of straightening it first then sharpening it. If you look at image A, even when sharpening on the cutting bevel, because the very edge has been bent, it would get totally ruined if it was sharpened on that side, especially when edge leading first. However, metal fatigue is a big issue that I'm glad you mentioned. I guess my problem is trying to find the balance between when I should bend the metal back first to save myself from over sharpening and decreasing the lifespan of my knife, and inviting metal fatigue from bending it back. I suppose the best thing (which was definitely mentioned somewhere in this thread) is to just touch up often, so the knife never gets too far out of alignment?

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by KeiOkay View Post
    Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions John. I really appreciate it.

    The damage would be from grinding off that bent part, instead of straightening it first then sharpening it. If you look at image A, even when sharpening on the cutting bevel, because the very edge has been bent, it would get totally ruined if it was sharpened on that side, especially when edge leading first. However, metal fatigue is a big issue that I'm glad you mentioned. I guess my problem is trying to find the balance between when I should bend the metal back first to save myself from over sharpening and decreasing the lifespan of my knife, and inviting metal fatigue from bending it back. I suppose the best thing (which was definitely mentioned somewhere in this thread) is to just touch up often, so the knife never gets too far out of alignment?
    its also a function of steel hardness... harder steels/more brittle steels (not always one and the same) will chip instead of deforming. Bending them back is not the way to go. Softer steels/less brittle steels can be realigined, but sometimes its just easier to grind in a new edge (which is much easier and quicker than it sounds)

  6. #46
    Senior Member Tristan's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot for the marker tips. I might use it as a diagnostic to see if I am doing what I think I'm doing now. So ideally without reprofiling, you should be abrading the entire marker off the bevel.

    If you have painted up above the bevel, then that portion should stay untouched unless you are thinning. And if you abrade the lower portion of the bevel it is a micro bevel that is being made, yes?

    That is about right yes? I'm guilty of just rubbing my knife on a stone till it gets sharp hoping that I'm doing the right thing.

  7. #47

    JBroida's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tristan View Post
    Thanks a lot for the marker tips. I might use it as a diagnostic to see if I am doing what I think I'm doing now. So ideally without reprofiling, you should be abrading the entire marker off the bevel.

    If you have painted up above the bevel, then that portion should stay untouched unless you are thinning. And if you abrade the lower portion of the bevel it is a micro bevel that is being made, yes?

    That is about right yes? I'm guilty of just rubbing my knife on a stone till it gets sharp hoping that I'm doing the right thing.
    seems like you get it

  8. #48
    Senior Member eighteesix's Avatar
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    I have a number of questions related to equipment.

    I'm looking at getting my first carbon gyuto. A simple combo stone 1/4 or 1/6k should work. I understand I will also need something to flatten my stones. I see most people using diamond flattening stones. Can anyone link a recommendation?

    I also read a lot about stropping but don't know much about it, if its necessary, and what to use. Any info there would be appreciated.

    Did I miss anything?

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by eighteesix View Post
    I have a number of questions related to equipment.

    I'm looking at getting my first carbon gyuto. A simple combo stone 1/4 or 1/6k should work. I understand I will also need something to flatten my stones. I see most people using diamond flattening stones. Can anyone link a recommendation?

    I also read a lot about stropping but don't know much about it, if its necessary, and what to use. Any info there would be appreciated.

    Did I miss anything?
    For flattening I haven't used anything but the Atoma 140x since I first laid hands on it. You can get them from Dave Martell. Check his section for a link to his store. Stropping is really important to help refine your edge. I used Cromium Oxide on balsa and leather for years but I tried 1 micron diamond spray on rock hard felt this past summer thanks to Dave and it provides the best results I've ever gotten hands down. Stropping is just one of those things where different products work better or worse for different people. Much of it is trial and error.

  10. #50
    Senior Member eighteesix's Avatar
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    where can i find more info on what to buy for stropping? maybe even tutorials. ive seen a lot about leather, abrasives, you now mentioned sprays.... lots to think about.

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