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Thread: Got Sharpening Questions?

  1. #81
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    With that wide bevel you have just thinned the blade a little. Correction is very easy: just put a more reasonable edge on it. With a single stroke on a 1k stone at a higher angle than you've used before you will raise a burr. Unless the steel is very weak you won't have to abrade that nicely polished relief bevel and waste material.

  2. #82
    I'm curious how much benefit there is to using stones of a many different grits on a single knife? FWIW I'm mostly sharpening yanagibas and gyutos, occasionally the sujihiki.

    I myself started with stones from Masamoto Tsukiji. I was talking to the senior guy there and he basically told me, you only really need 2 assuming no major damage has occurred to the knife...
    1) a medium grit
    2) a fine grit, which is mainly just for finishing purposes (he was very emphatic that I only use it for a few strokes at the very end)
    He told me I could take a coarser grit as well to use in case I really badly damaged the knife, but I might be best served just taking it to a shop... and he explicitly said he'd recommend me to just save the money. I believe the approximate grit equivalent of what I got was a 1000 and a 6000.

    But over time I've seen there are all sorts of intermediate level and extreme grit stones available out there especially for synthetics. You see guys on youtube etc. doing step by step progressions of even 10 different grit levels. Over the years I've picked up a couple of the Naniwa Chosera in several grits and done sharpening in a progressive fashion, but to be honest I've never felt these stones let me do a lot more than what I was doing before... in fact they sort of have made me feel less confident in the sharpening. Now, I know that different makers and stones have different feels to them and the same grit between brands does not necessarily mean the same thing. But does doing a progression through 10 stones really add value as opposed to just doing sharpening on one stone and finishing on another?

  3. #83
    For a gyuto with just two stones is enough. Even one medium grit is sufficient at time to time. The jump from 1K to 6K is perfectly normal. Never the less if you want you can add 2-3K in between, or just stop there (at 2K lvl). There is no need at all to go from 1K to 2K to 3K to 4 etc etc...
    As for another knives, like Yangi, the common knowledge says that you need further progressions to make the blade less "serrated" that makes clean cuts. So 6000+ grit. This will help to cut sashimi cleanly.

  4. #84
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    There was an old axiom, that more stones lessened the time and effort to prepare an edge for the next grit level. But more stones increased the chance to screw up.

    Sharpening styles come and go. A while back most people where taking their edges to 10,000 grit if not higher. Now a minimal approach is more popular.

    I picked up my stones, when the 10,000 grit sharpening was in style. It was no problem getting an edge on the 1000 and 3000 stones. But on the 6000 and 10,000 stones, the edge wouldn't cut. The higher grit stones were showing that their were problems with my technique. I use the finishing stones now to test my edges. If the edge gets sharper off those stones, its a good edge.

    My finishing stones are relatively soft, improper technique is readily apparent by the gouges.

    Jay
    I'm a over-sized, under-educated, two onions a month, cutting fool.

  5. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by jaybett View Post
    There was an old axiom, that more stones lessened the time and effort to prepare an edge for the next grit level. But more stones increased the chance to screw up.

    Sharpening styles come and go. A while back most people where taking their edges to 10,000 grit if not higher. Now a minimal approach is more popular.

    I picked up my stones, when the 10,000 grit sharpening was in style. It was no problem getting an edge on the 1000 and 3000 stones. But on the 6000 and 10,000 stones, the edge wouldn't cut. The higher grit stones were showing that their were problems with my technique. I use the finishing stones now to test my edges. If the edge gets sharper off those stones, its a good edge.

    My finishing stones are relatively soft, improper technique is readily apparent by the gouges.

    Jay


  6. #86
    is 1000k grit too high for a 240 gyuto?

  7. #87
    I am not sure there is 1000K (1000000) grit stones. If you mean 1K (1000) then that's the starting point for many.

  8. #88
    Most people sharpen to a middle range grit like 4-6K, I finish on my 8k and it is not too high of a grit.
    "Sucking at something is the first step to becoming sorta good at something." -Jake the Dog

  9. #89
    Senior Member erikz's Avatar
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    Bringing up an edge to 4~6k would be enough for any home cook imho. I'm not that good of a sharpener, still learning on cheap stones with a cheap ass knife.

  10. #90

    Bleeding finger

    Been sharpening on stones for a while and have been learning from various youtube clips and forums.
    Found a chip one one of the knives and decided it was time to get a coarse stone to repair the edge.
    Now, sharpening with the same technique i always use, controlling the angle with my left thumb, on the coarse stone i notice i am bleeding badly from the thumb.

    How do you more experienced sharpeners protect your fingers from the abbrasive course mud, or have you developed HRC 70 skin on your hands?

    With regards,
    /J

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