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WARNING: Get a barf bag. Another POS kitchen knife article. - Page 4
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Thread: WARNING: Get a barf bag. Another POS kitchen knife article.

  1. #31

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    The good thing that you can say about the article and the aforementioned mass market brands is that things like this can possibly steer people away from the Furi knives of the world or worse. There are a lot of knives that fall into the "or worse" category polluting the kitchens of America!! I like to think of products like Global knives as potential "gateway drugs"
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Ok, now I finally read the article, but I am going to be the lone dissenting voice on this one I think. I don't think the article was that bad -- and by that I mean barf bad. Sure we could have made it a lot better and there were a few really bad lines, but we geeks also would have made it too technical so that 90% of readers would have given up and not read it. I actually think the title and lead picture are the worst part and the expert knifemaker was not a good representative.

    With that said, the point about food being cut and not torn is valid. No one here would argue that men aren't the biggest knife nuts. The author said not to cut on glass or granite. Simple advice, true, but still a common mistake by the average person. Yes, I get sick of the Shun and Global branded approach, but I just had a home dinner prepared by a very good chef who used a global, and I have also seen chefs like Grant Achatz use a global. A lot of people and even some pros use them. The author acknowledged carbon knives and dared uttered the word 'patina'. Not a bad attempt at expanding the discussion IMO given space and the fact it is still a blog. The author also advised against knife blocks.

    Anyhow, that is my 2 cents. I studied economics and I often find crap in articles about the economy and flat out mistakes. My wife is a doctor and she often reads articles about medicine with errors. Every specialist can poke holes in print (and especially e-print) articles. They have limitations in space, editors, and need to think about the end reader.

    Just being the devil's (dull) advocate here, and I admit that the article didn't make me barf. Only a little bit of barf came up the throat and gave me that bad taste in the mouth

    k.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Yeah, I also finally read the article and am just mildly naucious. I reads like someone with no knife knowledge at all interviewed a few people, took tons of notes and then tried to condense the notes onto an article without ever really gaining a firm personal grasp or the topic or understanding g all of the interview's content.

    I'm actually quite surprised that she included as little goofy or wrong info as she did and and even managed to hit a few important points:

    -while different types / styles of knives rise and fall in popularity, the most important thing is to match the knife to the user and to the task.

    -Don't buy sets of knives; pick each individually

    -good knives are an heirlom investment

    -cutting board material and knife care and storage are important

    -consider shopping for knives at a store where the salesman might have at least a little more knowledge than wallmart or a department store

    -Carbon is for more that just your grandparents; the most expensive knife at SLT is carbon, so there must be something to it.

    -While she didn't do so well at listing all of the non-major brands or custom makers, she did mention that lots if options exist.

    The article didn't cover all the bases or connect all the dots, but I think that it gave the totally ignorant but interested consumer / unrealized knife knut, some food for thought and a place to start. Hopeful it will inspire some Googling that will eventually lead them here where they will be received with more excitement and acceptance than the article was.

  3. #33
    shiza... that article gave me a headache. It also made me realize I need a wustof to cut chicken... damn.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by mr drinky View Post
    Ok, now I finally read the article, but I am going to be the lone dissenting voice on this one I think. I don't think the article was that bad -- and by that I mean barf bad. Sure we could have made it a lot better and there were a few really bad lines, but we geeks also would have made it too technical so that 90% of readers would have given up and not read it. I actually think the title and lead picture are the worst part and the expert knifemaker was not a good representative.

    With that said, the point about food being cut and not torn is valid. No one here would argue that men aren't the biggest knife nuts. The author said not to cut on glass or granite. Simple advice, true, but still a common mistake by the average person. Yes, I get sick of the Shun and Global branded approach, but I just had a home dinner prepared by a very good chef who used a global, and I have also seen chefs like Grant Achatz use a global. A lot of people and even some pros use them. The author acknowledged carbon knives and dared uttered the word 'patina'. Not a bad attempt at expanding the discussion IMO given space and the fact it is still a blog. The author also advised against knife blocks.

    Anyhow, that is my 2 cents. I studied economics and I often find crap in articles about the economy and flat out mistakes. My wife is a doctor and she often reads articles about medicine with errors. Every specialist can poke holes in print (and especially e-print) articles. They have limitations in space, editors, and need to think about the end reader.

    Just being the devil's (dull) advocate here, and I admit that the article didn't make me barf. Only a little bit of barf came up the throat and gave me that bad taste in the mouth

    k.
    Drinky, you don't have to be alone. I didn't think it was that bad either. And I have used the Rhino Chop. No better or worse than a lot of santuku style knives in that size range. Mine didn't have all the holes in the blade though. I'm not sure what that is about.

  5. #35
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    It's always interesting to see the forum's reaction to these articles about knives, intended for the general public. Typically posts are made, about the lack of knowledge by the author or contributor. With all of knowledge of the forum, what would we present differently in the article? The Rhino Chop is too easy of a target, so its off the table.

    Jay

  6. #36
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    @ those that may think this sort of journalism is okay: This is about journalistic standards and yes, it's just a blog. In my field, anyone putting forth this sort of mix of crap and truth in public would be labeled a fool, never to be taken seriously. If you cook something and half the ingredients are high quality and the other half came out of the garbage, you are going to get garbage. Some people still may not mind eating it.

    Btw, the Rhino guy was banned from here a month or two ago for self-promotion in his avatar and sig line, iirc.

  7. #37
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    those holes... and handles... -shutters-

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Hermes7792 View Post
    those holes... and handles... -shutters-
    In the spirit of fairness: do the holes work?

    ...


    What about for vegans?

    ...

    Cheers,

    Jack

  9. #39
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    He prolly figgers that if grantons are good holes are fabulous. I cannot see how the holes could provide any help with anything, except for maybe making the blade hard to clean. Then you could punish bad behavior by making them clean the knife.
    Makle the vegans clean the knife.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    @ those that may think this sort of journalism is okay: This is about journalistic standards and yes, it's just a blog. In my field, anyone putting forth this sort of mix of crap and truth in public would be labeled a fool, never to be taken seriously. If you cook something and half the ingredients are high quality and the other half came out of the garbage, you are going to get garbage. Some people still may not mind eating it.

    Btw, the Rhino guy was banned from here a month or two ago for self-promotion in his avatar and sig line, iirc.
    actually, the article printed in the LA times... the blog is just the online version, but it went out in print first

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