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Thread: Shun Professional Electric Whetstone Knife Sharpener

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post

    While I am certain not going to buy one of these or ever advise anyone else to do so, I try to see the positive side of things. Like maybe using a machine like this or just reading about it might get someone thinking more about sharpening, waterstones, and ACTUAL professional methods. Or, maybe this sorta yuppie novelty is exactly what some consumers want... in which case, at least they won't be using dull knives or trying to sharpen on one of those manual, carbide, pull through V things.
    +1. While this is not appealing to sharpening aficionados (if not downright offensive), the average home cook will, in fact, have an advantage over other average home cooks...considering that 99% of their knives are dull...many never sharpened...ever. Why wouldn't this be an advantage?? ;-)

  2. #12
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    I can see how one might end up with wavy edges from this thing.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    Yeah, Dave, you should pick one up and toss all of your obsolete bricks.
    I'll even give you a few bucks for em -just cause Im a nice guy.

    It's a "professional" model so its made for pros like you! It has an auto shut off "feature" after 15min due to motor heat, but I'm sure it doesn't take you more than that to do all of your sharpening work for the day.
    Don't you mean he wishes everyone would pick one up so when most people screw up their $$$ Shuns, they'll send the knives to him to fix?

  4. #14
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    I can see how one might end up with wavy edges from this thing.
    How so? Too much pressure? Bad technique? Other than the fact that it's powered so things happen faster, I can't really see how this would be more prone to wavy edges than any other system. Bad technique + abrasive contact area less than 100% of the edge can = wavy edges. That even goes for free hand water stones. If anything, I would thing this would be LESS prone to wavy edges vs other powered pull though systems

  5. #15

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    Well, it looks better than a lot of the other crap devices, powered or otherwise, that you see in a lot of peoples' kitchens.

  6. #16
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    it has pretty bad user reviews, damaged knives etc.

  7. #17
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    If the speed of the pull is not really uniform, or the pressure varies a bit during pull through, the edge will be ground more in some areas than others.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  8. #18
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    If the speed of the pull is not really uniform, or the pressure varies a bit during pull through, the edge will be ground more in some areas than others.
    So bad technique on the draw & too much pressure. Other than the damage potentially happening faster, how is this really any different than any other system?

    Couldn't you cause the same damage freehand with bad technique and a coarse waterstone?

    It's important to make the distinction between tool and operator. Otherwise we should all be advising against knives as I could see how one might end up with cut fingers from those things.

  9. #19
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    "Other than the damage potentially happening faster, how is this really any different than any other system?"

    It is the speed that it happens at that is the problem. Especially for the average home cook.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  10. #20
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    Yeah, I can see what you mean. I guess motorized mistakes can be worse than manual ones, but I feel like things can only be idiot-proofed so far before functionity starts to suffer they become too complicated.

    So this is a bit OT, but what would you recommend to the homcooks that dont want to freehand and are considering something like this?

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