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Knife construction discussions, part 1: Forged vs. stock removal - Page 3
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Thread: Knife construction discussions, part 1: Forged vs. stock removal

  1. #21
    I am a cook, so I'll try to create an analogy in that regard.

    I have every intent of creating knives in the near future, but one of my concerns is how to label them. I do not feel that if the characteristics that make a knife great(instead of good) are in the steel itself, then I can't really take credit for making the knife. I wouldn't open a can of Campbell's soup, throw some basil in it and tell someone I made it.

    That said, there is significant investment and risk in heat treating steel, considering without VERY expensive equipment it is easier to screw up a great hunk of steel you got, perhaps stock removal is a more democratic solution. The geometry and overall design of a knife is at least as important as the steel's heat treat(both of which far outweigh the steel's composition IME), so that is something to consider. I know if someone is making knives with steel heat treated, or even sourced from a respectable origin, I would consider the knife a good buy if well designed. Perhaps it is just as valid as making a tomato soup in the winter with canned tomatoes.

    After all, I don't know how it must feel to spend years learning to handle the raw steel, purchasing very specialized, high-dollar equipment, master centuries old techniques to massage a hunk of steel into a performing object--and then have someone say "That has too much belly for me, no thanks."

  2. #22
    On thing you can't get with a stock removal knife is the characteristic thicker machi of a forged knife... Well, you could in theory, but you'd end up removing more stock than you'd have knife left over. Not that this has any effect on performance at the edge, but it feels dead sexy Plus I thought this thread could use some aesthetic balance, since we've only talked about performance issues so far.

  3. #23
    I'm sure that you can make some designs/shapes through forging that aren't easily duplicated through stock removal.

  4. #24
    Not to mention a lot of clad combinations aren't available as normal stock from a manufacturer. And I don't think that anyone sells stock that's two layers for traditional single bevel knives.

  5. #25
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    I think either knife can be exceptional, one isn't greater than the other. There are a lot of good makers doing either style. Most forged knives are carbon steel, while most stock removal knives are stainless. Some materials just lend themselves to different treatments. Tradition vs. Modern techniques, I appreciate both.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by UglyJoe View Post
    Not to mention a lot of clad combinations aren't available as normal stock from a manufacturer. And I don't think that anyone sells stock that's two layers for traditional single bevel knives.
    In Japan you can get laminated stock (including damascus) either for double-beveled or single-beveled knvies. Even some established smiths use them to cut down costs and stay competitive. They do forge them down though.

    M


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  7. #27

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