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    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Slicer fiasco

    Well, I did it to my self. After some phone conversations with Dave last year about how to best sharpen knives for BBQ, especially slicers, I knew better than to get my Forschner slicer (gotta love the cheap stuff when you are living in a 10x10 EZ-up for a weekend) too sharp. But after seeing what my polishing stones can do to a knife, and after testing the knife on paper and getting crazy sharp cuts, if figured, what could it hurt? So I took my 8000x and my strop to a BBQ comp and got my slicer, and my neighbor's slicer, really sharp. Then it happened. I started cutting through my brisket and there was a ton of resistance, worse than any other time in my three years of competition cooking. I chalked it up to bad cooking. But after the comp the neighbor mentioned that his brisket was hard to cut as well. I started explaining that I made the knives too sharp - removing any "teeth." He looked at me like I was crazy. "Too sharp???"

    I'm going back to my 1000 stone and I'll never go further on my comp knives.

    Am I the only one with this experience?

  2. #2


    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    My motto is cheap knives = cheap edge!


    This means I only put a low grit crappy edge on cheap knives because that's all they deserve and that's also what works best on them.

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    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    My motto is cheap knives = cheap edge!


    This means I only put a low grit crappy edge on cheap knives because that's all they deserve and that's also what works best on them.
    That helps. I guess I misunderstood. I thought the issue was the meat needing a different edge because of bark etc. I have some better slicers on the way and I look forward to trying them on a whole mess of brisket and pork before my next comp three weeks from now.

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    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    A better knife will still need a rougher edge for the bark. It's just that as a general rule the cheaper knives won't give any lasting edge if polished too much, they're better off being left rough.

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    Amen!

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    Yeah, it's both.

    Thats a good story though!

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    JBroida's Avatar
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    yeah... you always want some bite to your edge, but the amount varies by the task at hand. Its important to understand this and be able to adjust... finishing grit, angle, convex, microbevel, thin or thick behind the edge, etc.

  8. #8
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    I've got a lot to learn!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    yeah... you always want some bite to your edge, but the amount varies by the task at hand. Its important to understand this and be able to adjust... finishing grit, angle, convex, microbevel, thin or thick behind the edge, etc.
    That's the whole beauty about sharpening, folks. Getting good at it. Adapt and conquer!

    DarkHOeK

  10. #10
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    yeah... you always want some bite to your edge, but the amount varies by the task at hand. Its important to understand this and be able to adjust... finishing grit, angle, convex, microbevel, thin or thick behind the edge, etc.
    So can anyone help me understand the physics of this? Why, for instance, does my cheap, but sharp, yanagi make trimming raw chicken a true joy, while a sharp slicer, albeit a cheap one, makes cutting cooked beef so hard? The issue of bark isn't all that important when it comes to competition brisket because I cut from the bottom of the flat after I have trimmed the fat. There is no bark there. Why does one form of cooked meat need "teeth" while some raw meats benefit from super sharpness? I think if I got a good handle on this I could make better decisions about sharpening. I would also prefer to use sharper knives when slicing to reduce damage to the meat at the cellular level. I am working on the assumption that the cleaner the cut, the better the meat will look, and the better it will retain it's moisture.

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