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Thread: Slicer fiasco

  1. #11
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    raw chicken is very soft, almost as soft as say, raw fish, except for the bones. Yanagi are made specifically for raw fish and usually sharpened with a satin finish, unless you have polished it with your high grit stones. Beef has tendons, fascia, connective tissue, etc and offers more resistance, and cooking beef toughens the meat even moreso. On a microscopic level you could liken cooked beef fibers to cutting rope, and serrated edges are great for cutting rope. Hence a toothy edge is good to cut muscle fibers (meat).

    Don't think of knives with higher polish as automatically 'sharper' than knives with less polish. How well a knife cuts depends a great deal on the material that is being cut. Knowing the material will help you make the best choices on what edge will work best on it.

  2. #12
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Helpful!

    Quote Originally Posted by olpappy View Post
    raw chicken is very soft, almost as soft as say, raw fish, except for the bones. Yanagi are made specifically for raw fish and usually sharpened with a satin finish, unless you have polished it with your high grit stones. Beef has tendons, fascia, connective tissue, etc and offers more resistance, and cooking beef toughens the meat even moreso. On a microscopic level you could liken cooked beef fibers to cutting rope, and serrated edges are great for cutting rope. Hence a toothy edge is good to cut muscle fibers (meat).

    Don't think of knives with higher polish as automatically 'sharper' than knives with less polish. How well a knife cuts depends a great deal on the material that is being cut. Knowing the material will help you make the best choices on what edge will work best on it.

  3. #13
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    BTW, I should add that I'm going to use this thread as part of my research on slicers for competition BBQ that will be in the summer issue of Smoke Signals. Your thoughts are really helpful. I was talking to Chad Ward about writing about knives, and he reminded me that magazine writers do a lot of learning in public. I suppose that's what I'm doing right now.

  4. #14

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    Cut a plastic bag with your edge, and then you will get a feel for how elasticity creates trouble for even highly polished edges. When you cook beef(or any protein) you will tighten up the proteins and it makes the food more springy, and the micro teeth really help here.

  5. #15
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Cut a plastic bag with your edge, and then you will get a feel for how elasticity creates trouble for even highly polished edges. When you cook beef(or any protein) you will tighten up the proteins and it makes the food more springy, and the micro teeth really help here.
    That's really a helpful image. Thanks for it!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by monty View Post
    BTW, I should add that I'm going to use this thread as part of my research on slicers for competition BBQ that will be in the summer issue of Smoke Signals. Your thoughts are really helpful. I was talking to Chad Ward about writing about knives, and he reminded me that magazine writers do a lot of learning in public. I suppose that's what I'm doing right now.
    Monty, please let me know if you ever find the right slicer. I prefer my Kanemasa suji over my Konosuke for BBQ as it just doesn't feel like the Konosuke will hold up to a brisket. I really love the Konosuke over the Kanemasa for all other tasks but I would like a nice slicer that I can use for BBQ. (This is Kyle Corn from bbq-brethren, BTW).

  7. #17
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Kyle,
    For the article I'll be testing the Misono Swedish Steel Suji (240mm), Tojiro DP Suji (240mm), a 10" Wusthof Classic, and for some reason Wusthof included an 8" carving knife, so I'll include that as well. I'm trying to limit the knives to the price range that I know BBQ cooks already spend on knives. I would love to include a more traditional wa-suji but due to the cost I decided to skip them for the sake of the article. Probably a mistake but the shipment has been sent to the photographer so it's too late to include one. I wondered if you were here or not. This is a fun place but I sure am finding out how much I have yet to learn!

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