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Thread: Looking for a new gyuto with flat profile or a suji instead?

  1. #11
    Takagi honyaki chefs knife?

  2. #12
    So what do you guys like about a flat profile and how do you use your knife primarily?

    M


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  3. #13
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Personally I like a knife with a big sweet spot just back from the tip and the rest of the profile isn't important. I don't really care if the profile is flat to be honest, if you are doing the thrust cutting style, surely you are moving the knife back and forth anyway so it doesn't really matter if the blade is flat? If I am doing chopping I use the area just back from the tip, I rarely use the heel area. I probably prefer the rounder profiled knives because I feel they are a little more versatile to be honest. Just my opinion

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peco View Post
    Really? I use the area (from middle of the blade and towards the heel) at least as much if not more. Different styles I guess ...
    +1

    -AJ

  5. #15
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    The Kramer Zwilling has a nice thin and flat edge, before the sweep up to the tip. It is the most versatile knife, that I've used. The back end is a similar to a nakiri. The bull tip nose has been surprisingly useful in slicing onions and tomatoes.

    A relatively flat edge is better suited to a nakiri or cleaver. A flat edge with no curve, can be a jarring experience. On a gyuto a flat edge, puts the hand in awkward position. Kramer compensates with a large heel and a angled handle.

    Most gyutos with the heel up, the mid section of the knife is flat against the board. The angle of edge, going to the tip, plays a role in how comfortable or natural a gyuto feels in hand.

    Back when the ITK gyutos were being designed, Devin posted, that the profile was going to be based on the Suisin/Tadatsuna gyutos. I recently picked up a Tadatsuna 300mm gyuto. A few years ago Tadatsuna was the it knife on the forums and then nose dived its way out of fashion. I've been curious about the knife, so when one came up at a great price, it was time. The biggest surprise about the Tad, has been how natural it feels in hand, especially for such a big ass knife. Mr. Chance has mentioned how his ITK feels very natural in hand.

    Jay

  6. #16
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    Personally I like a knife with a big sweet spot just back from the tip and the rest of the profile isn't important. I don't really care if the profile is flat to be honest
    +1

    A nice flat area at the heel is good, but an entire flat area really downgrades the knifes versatility.

    I have been testing a Fowler 240mm gyuto that is nearly entirely flat. Although I like the knife, every time I do any tip work, I realize I have to keep the entire blade flat on the board; if you raise the blade, you will make almost zero contact at the tip... useless. Might as well be a giant cleaver.
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  7. #17
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    I would think that apart from the flatter profile, you want to pick a gyuto with a low rather than tall blade if you're going to use it for suji jobs. As I said in a separate thread about "go to knives", the Ichimonji TKC 270 gyuto has a great profile in this regard.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by jaybett View Post
    A few years ago Tadatsuna was the it knife on the forums and then nose dived its way out of fashion.
    Times were simpler back then ... if you wanted thin stainless, you got to choose between Suisin or IT. That was it. (I chose Suisin - didn't like the IT's muddled etching).

  9. #19
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    A possible, lesser known contender? White steel, Looks pretty flat to me. 42mm at spine, like a gyuto-suji hybrid. Finish is "rustic" apparently. Azuma Minamoto at Aframestokyo.


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  10. #20
    If I'm cutting with a gyuto, I tend to use the back half of the knife almost exclusively. It's is why I prefer flatter profiles, nakiri and chuka. Having a "typical" gyuto curvature to the tip does make tip work nicer though, I have to say.
    Len

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