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Thread: Flat profiled gyutos

  1. #11
    Senior Member TamanegiKin's Avatar
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    Agreed, even my KS isn't dead flat toward the heel and I prefer it that way. I actually find my konosukes profile to suit my style best as an all arounder.

  2. #12

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    I just got my first two Japanese knives in the mail, a Carbonext 240 gyuto and a Hattori FH 270 suji and I see what you mean. They both have a little tiny bit of upward curve right at the heel.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Do you understand that even a super flat profiled gyuto should not actually be dead flat?

    If a gyuto has a true flat spot anywhere along it's edge length it sucks and nothing is worse than the dead ass clunker - the gyuto with a perfectly flat section at the heel that upon making contact with the cutting board sends a shock wave up your arm that wants to blow your elbow out.

    Seems like this bit of knowledge has been overlooked a lot lately. I see so much talk of flat profiles that it's influencing how knives are made and maintained.

    So my message here is it's cool to be flat(ish) but not actually flat.

    Just my
    This is also true for cleavers, double sided kiritsukes, and nakiris.

    Jay

  4. #14
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    I agree that a gentle curve is good, I do look for the gentlest curve especially towards the tip, but yes true flats on a gyuto can be jarring depending when and how they happen

  5. #15
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I would like to know how Sabatier users think about this.

  6. #16
    A dead flat spot is doing to make the knife strange to sharpen, and won't likely last long at all...plus it would look strange as hell when sighted down the choil.

    But I do like a large contact area. Since we aren't cutting on granite(ARE WE?), it doesn't have to be dead flat to make full contact, since the edge will bite into the board.

  7. #17
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    The knife with the flattest profile I have is my Fowler and to be perfectly honest I am still having a tough time getting used to it. I also feel that as the blade profile goes flatter, balance is more important. If I am fighting with an awkward balance and trying to hit a sweet flat spot, the knife knife just seems clumsy to me. But that is just me.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    I just got my first two Japanese knives in the mail, a Carbonext 240 gyuto and a Hattori FH 270 suji and I see what you mean. They both have a little tiny bit of upward curve right at the heel.

    It's not just this though. Some knives don't have an upward curve at the heel at all yet still aren't dead flat.

    What I'm talking about is knives used on cutting boards need correct shape of the contact patch. The contact patch is the area of contact between the knife's edge and the cutting board. As the knife rolls from heel to tip we should see the contact patch shrink but it should never go flat. As the knife is used it needs to allow for movement along it's edge - no clunking. The correct movement can be a VERY slight thing to a big belly but it can't be flat.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by jaybett View Post
    This is also true for cleavers, double sided kiritsukes, and nakiris.

    Jay


  10. #20
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    I love flat profiles on knives, but none in my experience have ever been dead flat nor did I ever expect them to be, as it would be awkward to use--but that doesn't mean I don't prefer flatter profiles to those with belly. Figured most people understood that flat profiles does not equal flat as the edge of a sheet of paper.

    My Takeda kiritsuke has the flattest profile of any knife I've ever had, yet there is a very subtle curve along the edge that is almost hard to spot by just looking at it, but is noticeable when set on a cutting board--it has some of the best contact patch areas and is really fun to use. My Konosuke 270 suji is one of the best profiled knives (for me) that I've ever used, and that is because it is flatter than majority of knives and fits my push-cutting extremely well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Seems like this bit of knowledge has been overlooked a lot lately. I see so much talk of flat profiles that it's influencing how knives are made and maintained.
    Can you please elaborate on this a bit? To me, flatter profiles have always been a draw of Japanese knives in general, yet some do it better than others to meet the needs of people like me. Are makers now changing their designs to meet this 'new'(?) demand for flatter/much less belly and making dead-flat knives that turn out to be duds?

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