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Thread: Sharpening Serrated Edges

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Vangelis View Post
    Instead of an emeny cloth, can we use wet/dry sand paper ???
    Yes

  2. #42
    Hello, I'm new so don't yell at me.
    What about using one of those 3M foam sanding blocks? Seems it would conform to the shape of the serrations.

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Tack View Post
    Hello, I'm new so don't yell at me.
    What about using one of those 3M foam sanding blocks? Seems it would conform to the shape of the serrations.

    You never know until you try and I haven't so I wouldn't rule it out.

  4. #44
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tack View Post
    Hello, I'm new so don't yell at me.
    What about using one of those 3M foam sanding blocks? Seems it would conform to the shape of the serrations.
    If i remember correctly, those blocks are right angled and will break off quite easily.You are right.. as long as it is will abrade and conform to the shape and size of the serrations that wld achieve the objective. Too big and it may round and reduce the height ridges and also round them off ( high points between the hollows). I believe that it should be pointy

    good luck
    D

  5. #45
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    I have the 3m sanding block and I can't imagine it helping you sharpen your breadknife, it's funny I just got myself a gude and have been thinking about it myself, so I am about to order the dmt diafold serrated knife sharpeners, they look like exactly what you would need for a knife with a traditional serration instead of the scallop. The coarse is something around 350 or 330 grit, the fine is 600, the extra fine is 1200, could probably get away with just having the fine one.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by zitangy View Post
    If i remember correctly, those blocks are right angled and will break off quite easily.You are right.. as long as it is will abrade and conform to the shape and size of the serrations that wld achieve the objective. Too big and it may round and reduce the height ridges and also round them off ( high points between the hollows). I believe that it should be pointy

    good luck
    D
    I'm not talking about using the edge, just drawing the knife across the flat.

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Tack View Post
    I'm not talking about using the edge, just drawing the knife across the flat.
    I thought you were referring to something round to use on each serration. I'd say that a flat spongy block problem won;t do much if anything positive here.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by cookinstuff View Post
    I have the 3m sanding block and I can't imagine it helping you sharpen your breadknife, it's funny I just got myself a gude and have been thinking about it myself, so I am about to order the dmt diafold serrated knife sharpeners, they look like exactly what you would need for a knife with a traditional serration instead of the scallop. The coarse is something around 350 or 330 grit, the fine is 600, the extra fine is 1200, could probably get away with just having the fine one.

    The Diafold thingies are not wide enough in diameter for anything but the tiny serrations found on folders and even then they don't work well because they're tapered which means a constantly changing diameter being used. I have them and do use them for some really small serration patterns but no they won't work at all for standard bread knives.

  9. #49
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    How do you deal with reverse serration/scalloped knives like the Mac bread knife and such?

  10. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by rodneyat View Post
    How do you deal with reverse serration/scalloped knives like the Mac bread knife and such?

    I use the (bottom) corner/edge of a coarse stone for the bevel grinding.

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