Quantcast
My Childhood kitchen favorites(pic heavy)
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: My Childhood kitchen favorites(pic heavy)

  1. #1

    My Childhood kitchen favorites(pic heavy)

    This is a continuation of the other self-indulgent, pic-heavy post about the knife stuff I grew up with.


    It's ordered from my favorite things, to the least interesting.

    There are some things that have been lost in time--my parent's full set of vintage Revereware copper-bottom pots and pans, our Hobart-era Kitchenaid mixer with every attachment, the Dualit toaster, our almost magical stainless egg-frying pan(heaviest egg pan ever, but could cook an egg on a match), the cutting boards we had(1 pastry, 1 meat with blood groove, 1 small)...there are some that are no longer. But there is plenty left, and I wanted to share the fabulous kitchen tools left in the well-appointed kitchen I grew up with. You've probably never seen a kitchen like theirs in a house that for the most part pulled $6k per person, per year.



    This spoon. It is enchanted, surely, by the countless meals it has seen, and I cannot(repeat, CAN NOT) cook my best without a wooden spatula with at least a similar design. Mine current one's bamboo(and it's burned), and I will be replacing it with an heirloom quality wooden one designed exactly like this old one.



    We had these in the kitchen, and I used them to smash garlics and whatnot, but they are woodworking mallets, and yes, they are both ironwood. Heavy as .


    Best designed peeler ever. Some Japanese brand, but it has two slots, and the middle part does the cutting. The handle is just a round wood thing. Nothing fancy, but its the best I've ever used.


    You don't see this in every kitchen. It was for breaking down pigs and deer, and hangs on the cabinet:


    One of those cool hollow ice cream scoops that conducts heat from your hand to the scoop. Simple and effective.


    The only Jar Opener I've ever used that actually worked. It would twist a tire off a car if it were only bigger. It dimples the lids, but when you are opening an old mason jar with cane syrup in the threads to clean it out, you can't be too picky.


    Little copper pots--two for "Turkish Coffee", which were made in Lebanon, and one with a silver lining, made in Denmark, that is just for melting butter.


    Egg coddling pots--all made in England, and there's about 10 more of these. It's what the cool kids were doing in the UK before Sous-Vide.



    Vintage pastry scale, made in France. Just got a repair done via a new part made a local machine shop(can't say that about most modern tools).



    Revereware Electric Skillet with Sensatemp control. This is where I learned to love pancakes and bacon.


    Robinson Rosewood handled utensils, all made in the USA.


    Hand-made, custom Rolling pin


    Our seldom used Molinillo(it works fantastically):


    Wilesco Appfella, my dad still uses this thing ALL THE TIME.


    Anyone know this brand? It's a pastry scoop that I loved(and forgot to photograph).



    If you made it down to this point, and are still reading, you win the prize--I like you more!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Denton, Tx
    Posts
    510
    That is so cool that you still have all of this! Thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    234
    Great colletion of stuff. I'm a fan of that Molinillo

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
    That is so cool that you still have all of this! Thanks for sharing.
    Well, it's all still at my Dad's house. But I was visiting, and always like to cook there when I can.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    Great colletion of stuff. I'm a fan of that Molinillo
    Thanks! Me too.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Iceman91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    266
    I have a 35 year old cutting board that my dad made when he was 17....... it means so much to me. I just ordered a boardsmith board, but this board is still in great shape and i will never fully replace it.

  6. #6
    Very cool! My mom had all kinds of old never to be seen again odds and ends in the utility drawer in the kitchen. When we were kids, some of them got used as shovels in our sand pile in front of the house, or to hack down small trees. Our butts were usually sore when she found them missing, and sent us to retreive them! Ah, good times!


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman91 View Post
    I have a 35 year old cutting board that my dad made when he was 17....... it means so much to me. I just ordered a boardsmith board, but this board is still in great shape and i will never fully replace it.
    Thankfully I didn't have any boards burdening me from getting a Boardsmith--now my board will be a memory for MY kids like this. But I would love to have that Butcher Block.

    Quote Originally Posted by PierreRodrigue View Post
    Very cool! My mom had all kinds of old never to be seen again odds and ends in the utility drawer in the kitchen. When we were kids, some of them got used as shovels in our sand pile in front of the house, or to hack down small trees. Our butts were usually sore when she found them missing, and sent us to retreive them! Ah, good times!
    HAHA I bet you were a handful. I wouldn't have considered taking kitchen tools outside, I loved to cook as a boy, sometimes more than running wild in the woods.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    2,952
    Cool thread. Thanks for sharing.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,126
    I love that stuff. Every now and then I shop for vintage kitchen wares on eBay. That old kit just feels good in the hands.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  10. #10
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    2,952
    Thankfully, both of my grandmothers are still alive (one just across the water in San Francisco who is 101, and the other in Florida who is 94). I like to look in their kitchens at all of the old things. So well made and maintained. Nothing less than 50 years old. All well used. Not many scary sharp knives, but interesting nonetheless.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •