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Thread: Work in Progess

  1. #121
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    You know I'm surprised no one has said anything about the patina on my Kramer. Especially DC, sheesh. And Adam too...no I am not ready to use my damascus so don't even ask!
    Jason

  2. #122
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AFKitchenknivesguy View Post
    You know I'm surprised no one has said anything about the patina on my Kramer. Especially DC, sheesh. And Adam too...no I am not ready to use my damascus so don't even ask!
    Lelely patina, Jason .


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  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    I am going to start posting a quick update on progress of custom work. I think this will make it a bit easier to monitor where I am work-wise.

    Tomorrow finishing handles for
    Bao x 2
    Robert x 2
    Ravi x 1

    Prep work for handles this week (finish after sayas for the first batch are finished)
    Sean x 1
    Luka x 1
    Vladimir x 1
    Sergei x 1


    Batch of Sayas
    Bao x 2
    Robert x 2
    Rick x 1
    Jason x 1
    John x 1

    Thanks for the patience guys. Pics to follow.

    M
    How are the handles and whatnot coming along Marko? Haven't had an update in a while.

  4. #124
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    Got a few done from the list, but still a numbers to go. Will send you PM shortly.

    M


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  5. #125

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    VERY nice work, sire. Now the bad news. Your lignum vitae is not "real" lignum. it is something called "Argentine lignum vitaie." I have used it before. The real North/Central american stuff would have probably chewed up some of your tooling and made your knife rather handle heavy. Do you get sawdust that looks like moist yellow cake crumbs when you grind the Argentine stuff?

  6. #126
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    Who was talking about lignum vitae?
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #127
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    I made one handle in Lignum Vitae early in the thread. It wasn't too difficult to work it with new belts, but it clogged up belts and sand paper very fast, so I had to use rubberized cleaning stick over and over again. Perhaps it was a variety of L. V. from Argentina, I don't know. I got it from a forum member who had it ages. It and cocobolo, have the nicest smell from all natural woods I tried.

    M


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  8. #128
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    While that stuff is not true lignum, it is close in specific gravity and oily as all get out. I have a piece of it that I've been thinking about using. The grain is subtle, but has a fascinating chevron pattern when you look closely.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  9. #129
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    I love that wood so much that I will buy a chunk of it. My local lumber yard has them in logs. Over time, it acquires green color and even though it doesn't have much grain figure, the look is spectacular.

    M


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  10. #130

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    It is some oily stuff, that's for sure. The tendency for it to revert back to its natural color is what turned me off. You can oil it all day long and it still still going to fade back. Other than that, it seems to be very stable, durable and actually not that hard to work with when you first cut into it. I found that it doesn't really gum up belts any more than ironwood. Now when it dries, that is another story. The Argentine stuff, which is also known as Verawood, is almost a hard and dense as the real stuff, which is now on the CITES list. The real stuff is supposedly darker brown as opposed to the green and darkens more with age and gets harder than woodpecker lips as it dries. As for best smelling wood, having worked with both cocobolo and verawood, I would actually have to vote for unstablized amboyna burl. It smells like you are baking something tasty when you grind it.

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