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Thread: Butcher Knife Set - KKF Member Project

  1. #21
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    I'm not sure if the hankotsu gets overlooked or it doesn't meet the needs of a pro kitchen. The hankotsu has a number of features that make it a good boning knife. The front edge of the knife, does all the cutting, the middle is for scraping or for pressing down against the meat, while pulling on a bone, and the end is ground flat for safety.

    The knife is designed to provide a strong base, to the front of the knife, with a thick spine at the bolster which tapers down to a thin tip. The spine comes down at a angle to the tip, not as severe, as a kiritsuke. This maintains the profile of the edge, which gently rounds up to the tip.

    The tip is agile, it can easily trace around most bones. It really shines, with pork shoulders that are cut up into roasts, from the shank end, dealing with those odd sized shoulder blade bones.

    No matter how cautious one is, eventually the hand is going to slip, especially when the handle is slick. Having the edge ground flat, by the bolster is a good safety feature. A finger would have to go three inches or so, before it gets to the edge.

    The advantages of a hankotsu are the semi reverse tanto tip, which gives the tip a fine point and the edge being ground flat at the bolster. The middle part of the knife, which is v shaped, but has no edge works well as a scraper. I wonder how well it would work at removing silver skin?

    At the very least, I hope this gives people some food for thought in designing the new forum boning knife.

    Jay

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by jaybett View Post
    I'm not sure if the hankotsu gets overlooked or it doesn't meet the needs of a pro kitchen. The hankotsu has a number of features that make it a good boning knife. The front edge of the knife, does all the cutting, the middle is for scraping or for pressing down against the meat, while pulling on a bone, and the end is ground flat for safety.

    No matter how cautious one is, eventually the hand is going to slip, especially when the handle is slick. Having the edge ground flat, by the bolster is a good safety feature. A finger would have to go three inches or so, before it gets to the edge.
    Interesting, the Ergo Chef boning knife has the same feature

  3. #23
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    I love my hankotsu for lamb shanks/racks, short ribs, boning out strip steaks. Problem is, I already have one! I'd like to take this time reiterate my interest in a honesuke hybrid or kiritsuke tipped boning knife with no flex and no curve at the top or bottom for easy sharpening. Now do we go single bevel with this bad boy or what? Pros, cons?
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    How important, or not, are the finger guard part of the handles? Nearly all old patterns were made with no guards built into the handles like the guarded versions shown in the two photos above. Are they necessary?
    Absolutely! If you stabbed someone, if the guards weren't there, your hand would more likely slide over the blade cutting you, leaving DNA behind for the CSIs. Seriously tho, my wife likes em so yeah we want em.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    I too have one of these, and think everyone should consider it for their kit. I use it as a boning knife, small prep knife and picnic knife.

    I think a modern version of it, with a longer blade, would be excellent.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    I love my hankotsu for lamb shanks/racks, short ribs, boning out strip steaks. Problem is, I already have one! I'd like to take this time reiterate my interest in a honesuke hybrid or kiritsuke tipped boning knife with no flex and no curve at the top or bottom for easy sharpening. Now do we go single bevel with this bad boy or what? Pros, cons?
    I think Chef Niloc's Heiji stainless honesuki might be very similar to what you envision, look under the thread "Chef Niloc's Tool Box" in The Kitchen Knife, The Media Room. But, most of us would want a western handle of course.

  7. #27
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    well i cant blow up the pictures bc it says im not allowed but i like a finger guard as you call it but no it is certainly not needed.
    also im less into the weird designs and like the first boning knife suggested by pens tiger.
    i also have been taught by chefs that use a cimeter so in turn id like to see those made out of nicer steel however i dont know many that use that and while i enjoy using a cimeter its hardly my go to butcher knife... i like it way better for things other then fish and sadly way less then my chef knives but i have never tried one better then a crappy soft steel.
    eitherway some input im sure whatever you make will be interesting and be wicked sharp.

  8. #28
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    My $0.02:

    +1 I like the old Forschner patterns, like those Pensacola Tiger posted. A 12" scimitar and 7" boning knife, modernized with better handles and steel would be perfect.

    +1 on either thumb indentations on the tops of the handles OR the Pierre Rodrigue-style notch in the blade to improve grip.

    +1 on a custom roll from www.leather-worker.com. He can also stamp the roll with the KKF and/or name of buyer.

    -1 on finger guards, not aesthetically pleasing at all.

    Cheers,
    Lyle

  9. #29
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    how about lamb splitters

    http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/sh...hp?tid/814418/

    man that thing is awesome. i can only imagine how long it took to restore.

  10. #30
    Thanks for all the input guys, I'm listening to every little thing you say.


    dough, I love lambsplitters but I don't know about making them though.

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