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Thread: Butcher Knife Set - KKF Member Project

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    How important, or not, are the finger guard part of the handles? Nearly all old patterns were made with no guards built into the handles like the guarded versions shown in the two photos above. Are they necessary?
    Good question- My impression ( as a amateur with no formal training) is that they did not have highly structured handles so they could be used "back-wards" or reversed grip. Working on a hanging carcass, reversing the grip was sometimes necessary to make some of the cuts. I know I have used my knives this way when dressing and butchering deer and hog.

  2. #12
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Here's another vintage catalog page.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Didn't realize the discussion had moved to this thread so I'll just quot what I last said over there...


    Hmm maybe something like a honesuke and a petty/boning knife combined. Or like a kiritsuke tip boning knife?
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  4. #14

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    I prefer a straight or almost straight spine on a boning knife. And I think it should be a bit longer than most western boning knives, maybe 7.5" or so. Carbon is fine by me.

    I think a formed handle with some sort of finger guard is necessary. I know some of the old school butchers knives have basic block handles so you can grip it backwards and whatnot, but I would rather have the knife be really comfortable the way I hold it 99% of the time. Even with a formed handle you can flip it around if you need.

    What I hate about westerns is when the heel of the blade curves outwards, always annoying to sharpen.



    What I thought might be cool and unique way to deal with a finger guard, is a cutout like on some camp/field knives. Like this one Pierre made:



    The Scimitar should have a good sized handle with a traditional finger guard.

    Also mentioned in the original thread was to maybe include a leather knife roll for the set. Good for home users to store the knives in a drawer, good for pros to add to their kit/bag.



    Just an example. Another leatherworker's examples here:
    http://http://www.leather-worker.com...nife-Roll.html

    I also like theory's idea of a kiritsuke tipped boning knife. Profile could be interesting and useful.

  5. #15
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    Dave,

    I think a mix between a Honesuki and that knife Pierre made would be an awesome knife for butchering. I break down lots of tenderloins and french bone in rib eyes and I currently use a honesuki or an old school dexter that I have. But I feel like a mix of the honesuki and knife design Pierre made would make for a very useful butchering knife. I will say, I would prefer one of the knives to be very short (speaking about height). I like the old school looking knives but feel the profile is difficult for breaking down things like tenderloins (but then again, if there is that scimitar....)

    -Chuck

  6. #16
    Mr. Hospitality! UnConundrum's Avatar
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    Johnny, you're link is bad for the other example.

  7. #17
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    How about a meat hook with a Dave handle on it?

    With that said, butchery classes are all the rage these days, and that got me thinking. It might be interesting to get feed back from actual butchers and especially places like Fleisher's in NY that offer classes. Who knows, you might find some aspiring butchers looking for some new kit.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  8. #18
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    You guys are getting me thinking here.


    Chuck, I'm having a hard time visualizing that combo and how it would be made into one knife. Do you have anyway to draw this up?

  9. #19

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnConundrum View Post
    Johnny, you're link is bad for the other example.
    http://www.leather-worker.com/Chef-Knife-Roll.html

    this one should work

  10. #20
    Senior Member monty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    How important, or not, are the finger guard part of the handles? Nearly all old patterns were made with no guards built into the handles like the guarded versions shown in the two photos above. Are they necessary?
    There were a couple of knives on those vintage charts with some sort of finger grooves, for lack of a better term. Maybe not "guards" but something that seemed to suggest ergonomics. I also notice that those knives were much more expensive than the knives with relatively straight handles. Perhaps the reason they didn't produce as many ergonomic grips had to do with cost rather than utility? Even if it didn't cost more to produce them - though I suspect a specialty jig was needed thus slowing production a bit - ergonomic knives certainly seem to be part of the luxury of the more expensive knives. Personally, I like the finger guard.

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