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Exploring the Kiritsuke - Page 3
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Thread: Exploring the Kiritsuke

  1. #21
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    Another thing I noticed or think might be an issue is that the tip of the knife could be a bit fragile due to it being mostly a straight edge so at least it my mind slicing fish or whatever when using the tip it could easily chip or if you lack a good technique the flat part could make for some troublesome slicing. I have tried slicing stuff with one and carrots are a real nightmare or any other food that is prone to wedging. I guess the shape is sexy enough to make people buy the ryoba style ones. The real killer of all kiritsukes I hear is the nenox one which somehow supposedly cuts pretty well, though I haven't used one I here it doesn't wedge... I have no fishing clue as to how they do it, other than maybe it is taller?

  2. #22
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    Yeah if you are cutting things that don't come up higher than the shinogi line there really is much wedging, so a taller knife with a wider bevel would certainly help with that. And yes the tip is fragile. Mine does have a touch of curve towards the tip so slicing isn't a big deal at all, my estimation is that the ones with small curvature like mine are more forgiving to the user.

  3. #23
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    Fundamentally, I don't think there's a knife out there that can physically cut better than a kiritsuke. It's a knife that's shaped to get deadly sharp like a yanagi but also has the cutting power of a deba means that it cuts very well. But it's still functionally inadequate IMO. I can't see it really being used well in a professional kitchen.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by phan1 View Post
    Fundamentally, I don't think there's a knife out there that can physically cut better than a kiritsuke. It's a knife that's shaped to get deadly sharp like a yanagi but also has the cutting power of a deba means that it cuts very well. But it's still functionally inadequate IMO. I can't see it really being used well in a professional kitchen.
    I wouldn't go so far as the say it has the power of a deba. It is certainly a bit more robust than a yanagiba, but the edge won't take the abuse a deba can. I don't know why you think it'd be functionally inadequate, if you are looking for it to do all the things you can with a gyuto then yes it'll fall short. But for very fine julienne or regular julienne or any dice or bruniose, replacing a mandolin, cleaning and portioning boneless proteins, slicing cooked proteins. Shaving chives or scallions ect. Really once you start to get used to it and learn how it cuts and what you can and can't do with it, and don't try to make it something it isn't it is awesome.

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