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Thread: Broken sauce

  1. #21
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    I love cheddar in a gratin. I recommend not boiling your cheese.

  2. #22

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    Oh you can melt the cheddar down(below boiling) and once it's a consistent sauce(with enough fat content), boiling won't hurt it. I do this for 12-20qts of Broccoli Cheese at work about every week. Sometimes it's not thick enough, and if I thicken it with cornstarch to fix it, I've gotta boil it for a few minutes so that it thickens all it's going to--or else it might turn paste on the line.

    If you want to go low fat, you're going to have to up the slurry. But enough starch to keep the cheddar from coagulating is going to be so thick it won't be nice au gratin once the potatoes break down a little and thicken it more, and it cools a little--it'll be gluey. I'd switch to a blue cheese.

    ...Or a recipe that doesn't boil the cheddar.



  3. #23
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    OK, I have some things to try, thanks a lot for all the input!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #24
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    you got a lot of got a lot of good replies here.
    i think your sauce cooked too long when you baked it.

    if you are happy with the sauce one thing you could do to reduce cooking time would be to blanch to potatoes then just bake til golden brown in a fraction the time.

    an easier fix might be if you pour your sauce over your potato then cool the whole thing then bake it off once cool. watch out the potato and sauce doesnt sit in the danger zone too long though or you will create a whole new fun problem.

  5. #25
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    I would take the flour out of the equation. I slice my potatoes put them in a sauce pot cover with cream season and cook over a very low flame until they are done, stirring just enough to prevent the bottom from scorching. The cream will get very thick, like a good mornay and will actually have a cheesy smell. If you want to incorporate cheese, pull the finished product off the heat, when it cools slightly, stir in the cheese and pop the whole thing under a broiler until crispy brown.

    Just another method to try out, good luck.

    Drew

  6. #26

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    Just braise ox cheeks or chump or whatever part of beef you wish, just remember where the flavour is.
    Braise it looong and slooowly and dont forget the basics of love, celery, garlic, leeks, carrot, parsnip, onions, red wine, nice sized thyme/bay leaves and some button mushroom sliced.

    Now, I would say to first cool the meat in the liquid, as it will drink up to 10% of it, then reheat and do the following, but again, some people dont like 3 days recipes.
    After braising, take meat out, cool slightly, and when warm pick. Liquid reduce with the veg in until just starts to thicken, not more, strain through muslin or fine sieve.
    [its good time now to think of little cornstarch, not to thicken, but to keep the sauce from splitting while reheated again as part of gratin]
    Reduce more until you have glace. Season with whatever you feel like, some oyster sauce/worcestershire wouldnt hurt it, but its your choice.
    Now mix the picked meat with the glace, did it absorbed almost all?How does it taste at the moment?

    Slice wild mushroom into 1/2 cm slices. Fry on butter once, take out, strain, then fry twice keeping the butter for finely chopped onions/garlic. Fry it together and I like loads of parsley on them

    Now, potato slice on mandolin but hey, just slice it, at home I dont care if I see my fingers through the slice...
    Butter the baking tray, its up to you whether you want to mix the meat with potato and then bang it on, or you want to layer it up. I would do layering.
    Start with few extra layers of spuds on the bottom, then seasoning, then meat, 2x potato layer, seasoning, mushroom, 2potato, seasoning, meat etc, but do as you pleased. I do like when theres more potato on the botton, allows you to cut nicer, but that only matters if you plan to cool it down and cut cold/reheat.

    Anyways, please eat it after 15 minutes of taking out oven.

    Im not really huge fan of heavy creamed potato with cheese falvouring, do you have to?

  7. #27
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    I don't do any cheese or flour in my Gratin. Basically, heat your milk, season it (salt, pepper, nutmeg), add some creme fraiche, throw in your cut potatoes (I'll usually go with charlottes). Cook on low heat for about 20 mins. Gotta stir occasionally to prevent sticking to the bottom of the pan. transfer to a baking dish that has been rubbed over with some butter and garlic. pat down, dot with some butter all over. Into a pre-heated oven @ 180 Celsius for about 1 1/2 hrs. I cover my gratin with foil until the last 45 mins or so then remove the foil to brown the top. If you like, parmesan may be added in place of salt

    The potatoes should not be rinsed till they are free of their natural starch. That's what will thicken your sauce.

  8. #28
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    I usually par blanch my potatoes before I assemble the gratin. This way you don't have to bake it nearly as long. 350 for about 45 mins. Take the top off crank it up to 425 and brulee the top for 5 mins or until golden brown.
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  9. #29

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    I think au gratin refers to the dishware, iirc. However, thanks to America's love of potatoes in a box from Betty Crocker, potatoes au gratin has become synonymous with cheesy potatoes to the average person on the street.

    -AJ

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    I think au gratin refers to the dishware, iirc. However, thanks to America's love of potatoes in a box from Betty Crocker, potatoes au gratin has become synonymous with cheesy potatoes to the average person on the street.

    -AJ
    Au gratin refers to it being baked in a gratin dish, and a gratin dish is used to cook something that will be topped with cheese (or breadcrumbs, etc) and browned. That's the entire point of the vessel, to increase the surface area to volume ratio so you get a wonderful crust.
    If you cook your potatoes before putting them in the oven you should have more success. That's just a terrible recipe from Betty Crocker, sorry Spike.

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