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  1. #1

    RRLOVER's Avatar
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    Natural Amboyna??

    This is my first time working with it.Should I give it a good soak in danish oil or just keep it natural.Any suggestions?

  2. #2

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    I bought a stick a couple of years ago that was 2 x 2 x 20 and void free. I basically treated it like walnut or maple and gave it a nice oil finish. It didn't require the pore filling that walnut does. No complaints from customers so far.

  3. #3

    HHH Knives's Avatar
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    Mario, Its normally not necessarily to soak it in oil. It can be stabilized , But from my info, Stabilizing most pieces does very little to the weight of the wood, meaning it dont take stabilization well. One thing I do love about it is its smell. I sometimes sand some just to smell it! lol Like jm said, a good hand rubbed oil finish and the stuff glows and does not need much more extra work.

    Have fun bro..
    Randy

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

    240mm Stainless Gyuto!!

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    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    I am yet to use this wood, but a coat of tung oil could give it some extra protection. I have made a handle from unstabilized koa, gave it two coats of tung oil and as far as I know, it is sound and well.

    M


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  5. #5

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    How do you know which woods need a soak in oil or not? I mean, the ones that usually don't get stabilized, like ironwood, mallee, ebony, etc.

  6. #6
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    I normally read up about woods I work, but if I didn't know what wood it is, a first thing I would note is the weight - oily or dense woods (naturally stable) are quite heavy. Second, I would apply a little bit of a deep penetrating oil (linseed or tung oil) and see if wood absorbs any. Naturally stable woods like ironwood, ebony, cocobolo will not absorb oil (or can be effectively stabilized for same reason). Some times you have woods that have good water repellent qualities, but are not heavy. Koa is a good example. I is relatively stable when dry (in Hawaii, some still build paddles out of it) but it is not heavy and will absorb oil.

    Finishing oils won't make wood waterproof - for that you have to use poly (forms a film), but it will give wood some water resistance without forming a surface film like poly does.

    This might be an incomplete answer, as I only worked a few woods that were selected for their stability. I have not worked amboyna, but have some on hand and will give it a try one day.

    M


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  7. #7

    PierreRodrigue's Avatar
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    Hmmm, amboyna... Heavy burl is a little different, because of the grain going all different directions. I used some in thinner scales on fillet knives and folders. It moved. A LOT! on the fillet knife, the scales split at the pins, and it wasn't a tight fitting hole. The scales on the folder, moved enough that a visible gap between the bolsters and scales showed up, luckly, those pieces were repaired before they went out. Since then, I have only used stabilized stuff. Thicker stuff may not hold the same issues...


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  8. #8
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    There were a few pieces of Amboyna (for somebody) that I included with my last shipment to K&G a while back and they came back stabilized. I didn't work them so I don't know how well were they stabilized, but I was under impression that ambonyna can be stabilized.

    Mark from Burl Source would be a best source to answer this question, as a quick search in Google produced some of his blocks from a year ago.
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/sh...na-Burl-Blocks


    M


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  9. #9
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Of the burls I have seen, amboyna can be one of the denser ones, and when I started with handles, I made a few from unstabilized pieces - and never got complaints. That may be different for the bigger pieces in wa handles compared to scales. But since there are differences in the density between the burls, I now only use it stabilized to be on the safe side. Sometimes it does not seem to take on a lot of weight, but I also have pieces that came back substantially heavier. I also think that stabilizing does not take away anything from the wood, so that's why I would definitely suggest that. Woods like koa or thuya are actually nicer when unstabilized, but it's still safer to treat them just in case the pieces end up in very extreme climate zones.

    My 2cts.

    Stefan

  10. #10

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    The stuff that I used was quite dense and I think it had been drying for quite some time. I got it from a custom cue supply house and some of his wood was cut 30-40 years ago. As for soaking wood in oil, the only time I have heard of a knifemaker doing that is when Bill Moran mentioned in a video he did for the ABS. I used to use boiled linseed oil and soaked maple and walnut pretty throughly. I now use the Brownells London style gunstock finishing kit and just follow the instructions. It is kind of like Tru Oil on steroids and contains all of the oil, polishing compound, filler and wax you need to do a really fine oil finish. I have used stabilized amboyna a coupelof times and it works well. With that said, you had better like the color of the piece the way it is because you can't darken it a shade or so like you can with the the unstabilized stuff and oil.

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