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Thread: Natural Amboyna??

  1. #11
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    "I now use the Brownells London style gunstock finishing kit and just follow the instructions."
    So as that is now discontinued, what is the replacement?
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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  2. #12
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    First I will start with a smart a** answer.
    I would never soak wood in any type of oil unless I was making pilings for a boat dock. Or for conditioning a cutting board.
    Most oils will not cure properly, bleed and become a dirt magnet if used that way.

    Now for an answer that may be of some use.
    An oil finish should be applied in light coats that are allowed to dry between coats. Especially when using oil blends such as tung, danish and truoil. These are oil blends that both penetrate the wood and build up a surface coat. If applied too heavily they will not cure properly and can end up gummy.

    With natural (unstabilized) amboyna the most critical issue is that it be very dry before using. If you bought amboyna that is waxed like they do for wood turners, it probably is not dry enough. Most of the waxed amboyna I have bought over the years has had a moisture content over 20%. During the drying time amboyna moves a lot. What you want to be using is stuff that is around 8 to 10% moisture content.

    My experience with dry amboyna is that it is very durable. As well as easy to work and finishes nicely. I would work with it like I would a piece of natural walnut. It smells really nice when you are sanding it. The smell is a good tool for identifying real amboyna. Once you smell it you won't forget the scent.

    I get most of my amboyna stabilized as sort of an insurance policy. Plus it makes it easier to get a really good finish.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
    Phone 541-592-5071, Email burlsource@gmail.com
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  3. #13

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    And it smells like you are baking something yummy when you grind it which probably means that it is bad for you.

  4. #14

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    Hmmm. That sucks. Jeff's Outfitters also sells a kit for $35 that is supposed to be a copy of what Purdey uses on their stocks. The Brownells kit (African Express) was a little bit simpler and contained larger bottles of the various ingredients. It was pricey when I bought it, around $75 so it may all even out. It was imported from South Africa, IIRC, so that may be why it is no longer available.
    Jeff's kit comes with a bag of filler material, the slackem, rubbing and alkanet root oils and is enough for three rifle stocks, so you can imagine how many knife handles that will do. I still have a fair amount of the Brownells stuff because I think it had enough for 5 or 6 stocks (it had 6 bottles in the kit including two bottles of alkanet root which is what you use the most of), but I guess it will buy Jeff's kit when I run out. My experience has been that having all of the ingredients in one kit makes life a LOT easier than running around and trying to find rottenstone, filler, oil, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    "I now use the Brownells London style gunstock finishing kit and just follow the instructions."
    So as that is now discontinued, what is the replacement?

  5. #15
    The instructions on my Watco danish oil says to flood the surface and to allow to penetrate for 30 minutes,that's what I mean by a soak.I will just treat it like walnut and see if I like the results.Thanx for the info.

  6. #16
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    My bad.
    I thought you meant like immerse the piece and leave it to soak.

    I use watco danish oil regularly on boxes I make.
    1st coat is a liberal one like you mentioned. I let it set a short time (15-30 minutes)
    Then I wipe down thoroughly with an old t shirt. Following coats are lighter.
    When I am happy with the oil finish I spray with aerosol lacquer before the last coat of oil is completely dry.
    Spraying with very light coats I usually apply about 3 coats.

    This sounds like a strange way to do it but I get a really good finish on boxes this way.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
    Phone 541-592-5071, Email burlsource@gmail.com
    Visit our web store

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