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Thread: Wood choices

  1. #21

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    Rosewood is quite easy to get. What is VERY hard to find is real Brazilian rosewood because they banned the cutting of it a long time ago. Prior to that, it was the wood of choice for steel string acoustic guitar backs and sides. What you see now is either NOS like the secret stash that Martin and a few other guitar makers and tonewood dealers have stashed away or reclaimed stump wood. Last time that I heard, Brazilian rosewood was like a $2500 upgrade on a Martin or Santa Cruz guitar. East Indian rosewood is what you see mostly because it is plantation grown along side tea bushes. The toughest stuff to get is "real" or Cuban mahogany. That stuff hasn't been readily available since at least the mid 50's. By the time the "golden age of electric guitars" came around in the mid 50's. Gibson and others had stopped using it. That stuff is the wood that the $1,000,000 antique Chippendale tables are made from. A huge Cuban mahogany tree in the Florida Keys got hit by lightning about a year ago anit was auctioned off. The winning bidder was the US government. The GSA bought it to use for a major interior restoration project on one of the historic buildings in Washington.
    Now I get to scare folks about your "edible sap or nuts" comment. Cherry fruit is edible, but cherry wood and bark have cyanide in them. On horse farms in Kentucky, they fence cherry trees and have to make sure to police up fallen branches so the horses don't eat them.

  2. #22
    Still Plays With Blocks
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    Quote Originally Posted by ******* View Post
    Now I get to scare folks about your "edible sap or nuts" comment. Cherry fruit is edible, but cherry wood and bark have cyanide in them. On horse farms in Kentucky, they fence cherry trees and have to make sure to police up fallen branches so the horses don't eat them.
    Shame on you for trying to scare folks! That's not nice.

    I've looked on the internet and can't find any information about cherry wood/bark containing cyanide. What is the source for your scary information? Could it be the SWAG method? I would think if the wood or bark is so deadly to horses they would have the trees removed.

    BTW I don't use bark.

  3. #23
    A lot of guys useing cherry for smoking in the BBQ pit, should be dead!


    Feel free to visit my website, http://www.rodrigueknives.com
    Email pierre@rodrigueknives.com

  4. #24
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    ***BULLETIN***

    Further investigation by my crack research team has revealed that the wilted leaves of the cherry tree, not the wood or the bark, has compounds that will convert to hydrogen cyanide when eaten by livestock. In the researchers opinion, based on the additional study, the wood of the cherry tree has been deemed safe to use.

    Film at 11:00.

  5. #25
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    LMAO David, nicely done.

    Interesting info too, thanks to both ******* and David for droppin' the knowledge.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  6. #26

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    LOL. Supposedly, apple seeds also contain trace amounts of cyanide compounds. Yesterdays old wives tales can be today's FDA warnings and the basis for tomorrow's cheesy lawyer commericials.

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