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Thread: super wear resistant steels

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    DevinT's Avatar
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    super wear resistant steels

    I am curently experimenting with some steels in the super wear resistant range.

    Up until now I've used steels that have good/great wear resistant properties with the greatest edge stablity and ease of sharpening.

    The SWRS wil be hard to sharpen but will hold an edge for an extremely long time. They should have good edge stablity due to the powder metal process. They are a tool steel and not stainless. I'm making these in sanmai to make them easier to finish for me and the stainless clad will will hold up better in the kitchen.

    We did some heat treat testing and some destructive testing and I'm very, very impressed.

    I'm looking for some input on this so please chime in.

    Hoss

    P.S. I will have a couple of these for sale at the Vegas show.

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    Aw man... I'm very, very curious! Decisions, decisions... I want to try sharpening one on stones before I decide to get something like this but sounds very cool.

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    DevinT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Aw man... I'm very, very curious! Decisions, decisions... I want to try sharpening one on stones before I decide to get something like this but sounds very cool.
    You should bring some of your sharpening stones to Vegas and try it out.

    Hoss

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    Quote Originally Posted by DevinT View Post
    You should bring some of your sharpening stones to Vegas and try it out.

    Hoss
    Deal!

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    Back in my previous life we used to make the bulk of our foundry patterns out of cast iron with a wear coat of either hard chrome or nickel, nickel being superior. Later we transition into D2 tool steel which was an order of magnitude better than nickel. Expensive though so it was reserved for higher volume stuff, around 250,000 cycles or so. For the mega runners, the 500,000 or 750,000 cycle, even a million cycles we used PH13. Awesome stuff for wear. Down side was you had to be sure your pattern was absolutely perfect before you heat treated it because once it went to heat treat there was no going back. No engineering changes, no machining, no drilling, nothing.

    It sounds like your steel is a step past that. So one concern I would address would be the angle of the edge. I imagine once it is set, it would be near impossible to change it. That's probably educating your customer issue. It also means either you need to choose wisely or your customer needs to be sure he chooses wisely.

    The other concern I suspect would be the actual sharpening. I would have doubts that traditional stones would do the job. I remember back when I had to polish sapphire windows for engines it was diamond media only. The final stages were not that hard and I imagine restoring an edge on the knife would also not be that difficult, with the correct media. I imagine these knives might be similar in that stones might not be the best option and diamond media preferable or required. Probably just need a single diamond plate though, not a range of them. Again, a customer education issue.

    Finally, I think with the difficulty in creating an edge to begin with, the knife would have to be supplied with the best OOTB edge possible from you since the end user would not really truly be sharpening the knife but rather just restoring the edge.

    Those are the things that come to my mind. Sounds like a neat project.

    -AJ

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    Hobbyist Craftsman Hattorichop's Avatar
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    All I can say is that out of all my knives (even my Devin Thomas ITK) my Tanaka R2 which is a PM steel has the best edge retention of them all. It also sharpens up quit easily. IMO it is the best steel for knife making.

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    Hoss, if you have found a super wear resistant steel that can take the kind of edge that you demand in your knives, then I think this can only be a good thing. I know that steel like CPM M4 has incredible wear resistance and great edge stability at what is considered to be quite a fine edge in some pretty brutal applications like cutting comps, but I have no clue as to how absolutely fine of an edge it or other stuff like 3V will take. It will be interesting to hear what you find out.

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    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DevinT View Post
    P.S. I will have a couple of these for sale at the Vegas show.
    Quote Originally Posted by DevinT View Post
    You should bring some of your sharpening stones to Vegas and try it out.
    Bring your checkbook too TK. There are worse ways to rid yourself of money in Vegas.

    I really love the edge retention of your AEB-L. And I think your mystery PM steel is significantly better than your AEB-L. So if we are talking about a large jump over the PM, this will be quite something. You might need nicknames (like you have for Spicy White) for all these secret steels so that we can keep them straight!
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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    Of the knives I own, the only one that has crazy edge retention is a Harner in CPM154. I find it a difficult knife to sharpen, after a few times on the stones I was able to get a good edge on it. In order to do this I dropped down to a 320 Shapton Pro, I was a bit weary to do this from the beginning, I was able to form a nice burr then went to a Shapton 1k. Then I jumped to a Kitayama, previously I had used a Suehiro 5K but never liked where this got me. The softer stone never felt right on that steel. The edge was still not as sharp as most of the other knives I sharpen, but the edge held at about 90% for a few days without any noticeable difference. In the end it was a bit tricky for me but the time spent on the stones was more than made up for over the next few days. Just my 2 cents, the perspective of a relatively novice sharpener.

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    Interesting. I didn't have any problems sharpening Harner cpm154. I thought it was fairly easy to sharpen, enjoyable, even. I also didn't thing it had crazy edge retention, although it was very nice in that regard.

    Anyway, I just did my first profile fix on a DT-super gyuto. I started by sawing on a coarse stone to get out a hole in the edge. I sawed for several minutes and the damn thing still has a slight hole. Then I spent 15 min grinding an edge back on it with a 1.2 k sigma II. That wasn't a lot of steel either. It is a VERY thin knife near the edge. Now THAT is wear resistance, folks. That stuff is CRAZY.

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