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Thread: Bearnaise sauce

  1. #1
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    Bearnaise sauce

    Few things I was curious about.

    1. Most places have herbs filtered out. Is it a must?
    2. The sauce taste, should you feel vinegar or wine cut through the richness of butter or just provide a tiny zing?


    My first attempt. I prefer to see herbs/etc but I imagine not everyone likes it?

    Anyone has a great recipe?


  2. #2
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    I can see yours splitting lol
    Each yolk can hold upwards of 15 oz of butter the way I do it.

    Start by reducing tarragon vinegar.
    Now start with the yolk, I add about 1oz white wine but you can use water, and whisk with a balloon whisk until it triples it's size and almost hits ribbon stage,
    Then place the bowl over a heat source and continue whisking until you hit a solid ribbon stage. Now you can whisk in the butter. Once you form an emulsion you can stream in much faster than people think. Just whisk till all the butter is in. Don't worry if it seems too thick because this is where you add the reduced vinegar, I also like a bit of lemon juice and Tabasco. Now add Kosher salt and fresh white pepper and some finely minced fresh tarragon leaves. Serve immediately or hold at optimal temperature.

    And don't break it!!
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    I can see yours splitting lol
    Each yolk can hold upwards of 15 oz of butter the way I do it.

    Start by reducing tarragon vinegar.
    Now start with the yolk, I add about 1oz white wine but you can use water, and whisk with a balloon whisk until it triples it's size and almost hits ribbon stage,
    Then place the bowl over a heat source and continue whisking until you hit a solid ribbon stage. Now you can whisk in the butter. Once you form an emulsion you can stream in much faster than people think. Just whisk till all the butter is in. Don't worry if it seems too thick because this is where you add the reduced vinegar, I also like a bit of lemon juice and Tabasco. Now add Kosher salt and fresh white pepper and some finely minced fresh tarragon leaves. Serve immediately or hold at optimal temperature.

    And don't break it!!
    I know

    This was a trial run because I never really had it before, so I wanted to make sure I even like it, but I like it so much that I am saving some for dinner. Maybe it's bad pics/etc but it didn't split. I also didn't use whisk and just had a spoon to mix, so maybe that's why consistency looks funny but it didn't have any lumps.

    I am a newb to these sauces, so really want to be able to make few of them well and this is the one I want to master.

  4. #4

    ecchef's Avatar
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    I dunno ptolemy...looks broken to me too. Buy a whip.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  5. #5
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
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    First you must master the "mother sauce"(hollandaise),then you can master its derivatives(Charon,Mousseline,Bearnaise etc)... :-D

    And a whisk is a must..

  6. #6
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    Be careful with the yolks; too hot and they curdle. I made hollandaise sauce and its derivatives over a hot water bath until I had a feel of how far I could take the yolks (with regard to temperature).

  7. #7
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    Be careful with the yolks; too hot and they curdle. I made hollandaise sauce and its derivatives over a hot water bath until I had a feel of how far I could take the yolks (with regard to temperature).
    I always make mine over a double boiler, makes things easier for me.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ratton's Avatar
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    Cool

    I was taught to make mine in a blender!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratton View Post
    I was taught to make mine in a blender!!
    me too or a robot coupe. I have never had one break in 18 years.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    I always make mine over a double boiler, makes things easier for me.
    Right on the gas burner. You turtles need to take a few shifts in a breakfast joint.

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