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  1. #11
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Right on the gas burner. You turtles need to take a few shifts in a breakfast joint.
    Or own a gas burner....

  2. #12
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Right on the gas burner. You turtles need to take a few shifts in a breakfast joint.
    +1. and to answer the origional questions... no and yes. I perfer to strain the reduction and add fresh minced tarragon and chervil just before plating only because I have a thing against army green herbs in my dishes and do whatever I can to eliminate it. Another thing that I've also enjoyed to kick up the tarragon flavor is to add a bit of Pernod to the reduction.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    Right on the gas burner. You turtles need to take a few shifts in a breakfast joint.
    Hey not everyone's workplace has an old busted burner with a giant, exposed pilot to keep the heat low enough.

    Ok mine does too, but that's besides the point.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    This is the recipe I use when I teach this sauce:

    "Bearnaise sauce

    Essence:

    Chop finely:

    1 shallot
    2 tablespoons fresh tarragon
    1 tablespoon fresh parsley

    Put in a small sauce pan with

    ¼ cup tarragon vinegar
    ¼ cup water

    Boil down to a couple of tablespoons of liquid, and allow to cool. Do not put essence in the sauce hot, or it will separate and ruin the sauce.

    The tarragon and vinegar are the key elements here, but proportions vary widely from cook to cook. Some use white wine instead of water, some use much more tarragon and no parsley, some use spring onions instead of shallots, etc. It doesn’t really matter as long as the tarragon and vinegar are there.

    Make Hollandaise base sauce:

    Everyone uses a double boiler, which is a good idea. Ignoring caution, put four egg yolks into a sauce pan and put on low heat, stirring constantly and being certain to scrape the bottom of the pan so no part of the sauce stays in contact with the pan for too long. A “spoonula” works best.

    As soon as the eggs are on the heat, start adding 2 sticks of unsalted room-temperature butter a tablespoon or so at a time, stirring until the sauce thickens noticeably -- about 20 minutes. Add essence to taste and re-thicken. Remove from heat and keep stirring until no longer hot, or the sauce will separate. Serve onto or beside meat that is not too hot, or, again, the sauce will separate. Some sauce on the side is good, too.

    This process cannot be learned from print. It takes experience. Everyone has sauces separate, in which case you have scrambled eggs floating in butter – horrible -- throw it out and start over. It is unwise to start a Hollandaise or Béarnaise without enough eggs and butter for a do-over.

    There are other ways to make this sauce, such as using a blender or food processor or whisk to emulsify, but those sauces are not as good. Thickening by cooking is preferred."
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  5. #15
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
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    Whole butter instead of clarified..interesting..

  6. #16
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    Theory's method is the same way we do it here. Most of the time we only use water instead of wine. We use a tarragon leaves that are stored in vinegar for our bernaise though. And a little lemon juice is a must. We use cayenne pepper instead of tabasco but that is your preference.

    Clarified is the best if you want to hold it for any period of time however whole butter works just fine.

  7. #17
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Yeah I whisk the yolks straight over a gas burner full blast. Once they are ready I place the bowl in a circular insert cutout over the steam table and whisk in the clarified butter, then finish as I stated earlier.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndoughy View Post
    Hey not everyone's workplace has an old busted burner with a giant, exposed pilot to keep the heat low enough.
    Lol! Nah, I don't do it low and slow. I just stir a bunch of butter into scrambled eggs and call it Haulin' Daze. The yokels around here don't know the difference.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by shankster View Post
    Whole butter instead of clarified..interesting..
    The "mouth-feel" isn't quite as silky, but depending on the application it's really no big deal. It also gives you a boatload more protection against breakage. Softened room temp whole butter mixes into the yolks like it was meant to be there--clarified butter is a lot more fussy.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
    It also gives you a boatload more protection against breakage.

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