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Thread: Tanaka blue #2 gyuto

  1. #11
    Senior Member
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    i love me blue steel.


  2. #12

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    The Tanaka 240 blue/damascus is probably the best bang for the buck knife for a <$200 new purchase.


  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
    The Tanaka 240 blue/damascus is probably the best bang for the buck knife for a <$200 new purchase.
    +1 I have one and it takes/holds a great edge.

    Chris

  4. #14
    Senior Member augerpro's Avatar
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    Been using my 210 Tanaka in blue 2 for about a week and I'm impressed with the value. The grind/geometry seems real good. Thin-ish but not a laser. Slides through food pretty darn well. With the extra weight over my Ginga it seems to be a better chopper, especially when just using the tip. I'm sort of torn, I really like my Ginga, and I think for slicing it is still better, but not by much, the extra weight of the Tanaka really helps it go through food with any sort of chopping motion. I do not like the Tanaka's profile though, I like flat-ish and somewhat parallel to the handle, the Tanaka is just a curve up up and away. Put some Sam Maloof poly/oil finish on the handle. I think for $130 this is a great intro Japanese knives, once I learn everything I like about it, it will definitely end up in a friend's hands.

    Makes me wonder what combines the effortless slicing of the Ginga with some weight? A Shig is getting tempting...
    ~Brandon

  5. #15

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    I have had mine about a month or so and have really been enjoying it. Sharpens easily and just a lot of fun. It doesn't have the best food release that's my only complaint
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  6. #16
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Mike, I was hoping you'd tire of it and sell it to me, lol. I like your etch; very pronounced.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  7. #17
    Senior Member panda's Avatar
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    are there any sharpening and/or grinding techniques to improve food release? that's pretty important to me. and i'm thinking of doing the hot vinegar etching process to form a full fledged patina. don't much care for the damascus, would prefer monosteel or a simple cladding like the ginsanko series.

  8. #18
    Senior Member eaglerock's Avatar
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    I love my Tanaka 105 blue, gets scary sharp and hold the edge for ever.

  9. #19

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    Nov 2017
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    Good morning, sorry to reply on this tread; the question really should go on the sharpening section but I don't have permission yet.

    I recently bought a tanaka 240 gyuto kurouchi blue steel; and I have a doubt sharpening it.



    https://www.This Site Not Allowed He.../takugy24.html

    When I received it i did a few stropping passes on my 3000 grit suehiro with around 10 degrees angle and it cuts fine. But I've seen in some youtube videos that seems like they sharpen all the non blacked area, similarly to a skandi knife and now I'm not sure about the angle. Usually I rest my index finder of the hand that's holding the knife extended and centered on the spine and I use this half of a finger touching the stone like an angle guide to keep a consistent angle

    I defend myself at freehand sharpening. I shave with straight razors so I have a few water stones, mainly suehiros and naniwa superstones. And I keep my low end knifes fairly sharp (ikea and arcos petty knifes, a henckels pollux set...). This tanaka is my first good knife.


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