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  1. #1

    Advice new Sakai knife...

    I just receive my first J. knife. It's a Sakai forged white n°2 WA-GYUTO 240mm brand Ichimonji-Kichikuni (fron Keichii). I'm a french newbie and would like some advices : can-you see something wrong with sharpening out of box ? Seem razor-sharp, with a great microbevel but I'm a newibe and need advice...
    Thanks











    https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-B...0/_MG_3501.jpg

  2. #2
    Bienvenue!

    Great pics Nothing wrong with sharpening a knife out of the box - in fact, you will get a much nicer edge than the factory edge if you are already familiar with sharpening knives yourself.
    Len

  3. #3
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    Everyones different but I wouldn't. I always use a knife OOTB for a few days or even a couple of weeks to get a good feel for what I have, what it's strengths and weaknesses are, and how it works best. And then I start thinking about how I can improve it. Sharpening over a perfectly good edge is a waste of steel, imo.

    My Sakai Yusuke and Masamoto HC came with fantastic geometry and were never quite the same after I tinkered with the angles - so I learned my lesson there: look before you leap.

    I don't know what sharpening equipment you have, but one thing you can do is strop with newspaper if you don't have anything else. This is a good way to play with the knife without having to do anything drastic and irreversible.

    Great pics btw!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I am like Seb, I use new knives until they basically need sharpened, I like to get a feel of them before I sharpen. Sometimes I like them better before I sharpen, but not that often.I have a Sakai Ichimonji-Kichikuni usuba.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    BTW, that is a beautiful knife!! I have been close to getting one of this series from time to time. Great workhorse/allrounder, I hear.

    FYI, note that the blade has three different layers: stainless, iron and carbon steel.

    The 'hazy' area of the blade is, I believe, jigane (soft iron outer cladding) and will start to turn brown as soon as you start using it - nothing to worry about but watch for rust (darker, redder); if you see it, remove with a mild metal polish like Simichrome or Flitz, you can even use toothpaste if the rust is very new. The hagane (hard carbon core) will probably turn grey and then a darker blue over time to make a nice contrast.

    If it matters, be careful with the stainless steel cladding - it is likely to pick up scratches easily - so scrub with soft side and not rough green side of scourer. Even some tea towels can leave scratches!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Seb View Post
    be careful with the stainless steel cladding - it is likely to pick up scratches easily - so scrub with soft side and not rough green side of scourer. Even some tea towels can leave scratches!

    pretty sure this is a typo, but i think the knife is carbon hagane and jigane

  7. #7
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    pretty sure this is a typo, but i think the knife is carbon hagane and jigane
    Not a typo, Jon. Possibly a mistaken assumption on my part. But I think you are right, thanks for the correction!

  8. #8
    It could well come with a really nice edge from the factory, I dunno.

    Just for me, I've always enjoyed my knives more after putting my own edge on them - but yes, some did indeed come with nice edges out of the box To each their own, so there's nothing wrong with either approach. It depends on how you feel about the edge as it is right now and how comfortable/confident you are with sharpening. The safest route is, of course, to leave it alone for a little while first.
    Len

  9. #9
    If I did nothing else I'd remove those grind marks from the choil, talk about rough.


    And welcome to KKF

  10. #10
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Are you asking if people think it is okay to sharpen right out of the box, or if we can see something wrong with the sharpening job your knife came with?

    I personally like to sharpen the minute I open a knife and examine it. As long as you start sharpening from the bevel shoulder down as our godfather Dave recommends, you can improve performance without worrying about altering the makers edge ratios.

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