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Mighty Knives and Wedging
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Thread: Mighty Knives and Wedging

  1. #1
    Senior Member JanusInTheGarden's Avatar
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    Mighty Knives and Wedging

    So I was about to pull the trigger on a masamoto hc until I read a review labeling it as "mighty." While some folks surely love a mighty knife, I tend to find that my current mighty knife--a hiromoto--wedges so much (even after thinning) that I'm totally put off to it. I'm still researching to see if the Masamoto is too thick for my tastes, but it got me thinking: what factors can cause wedging?

    In the case of the hiromoto, for instance, is it simply the girth or does cladded design provide further resistance? My konosuke seems to desire constantly to completely fall through food, but even with certain very large prey it can wedge--i.e. butternut squash and very large potatoes. Is thin a big answer to avoiding wedging?

    How much does geometry and distal taper play a role?

    Do certain profiles avoid wedging more than others?

    Convex grinds?

  2. #2
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    Anything I've tried (not many knives but they span from laser to mighty) has gotten stuck in butternut squash. There are ways to solve this with butternut squash so that even my supposedly mighty Heijis get through easily. It's the sweet potatoes that have been a real pain for me. Anyways, all that is to say that I love my "mighty" Heijis much more than the thinner than usual Shig or the stock laser (Tadatsuna) that I used. I know Marko said spine thickness matters, but I can't imagine anything cutting more effortlessly than these Heijis when they're sharpened correctly. So my vote is for geometry.

  3. #3

    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    My Shige is one of my best cutters of butternut squash. Try adjusting your technique, or angle of approach, or the position of the squash on your cutting board. All three will change how the knife cuts. Get a couple butternut squash, they aren't that expensive, and then just try different ways of cutting. Often the best technique with one knife doesn't work well on another, depends on the type of grind and thickness. Butternut is actually of my favorite things to cut. Then afterwards you can make soup.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    Yea. I've found that lifting the heel at the beginning of the cut and incorporating some slicing motion makes the knife almost glide through the squash. It's really surprising at first. Now sweet potatoes...I've tried lots of things, and it only makes them less bad, but not nice, to cut.

  5. #5
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I find a suji and a forward slice throughthr downward motion are the answer to butternut and sweet potatoes.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

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    Butternut squash is no different than a russet to a chinese cleaver.

    Also, for hard root veg, I love my Shig. cutting potatoes with it does not get old, and it's 4.5mm spine @ heel.

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    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    I was asking for advice on how to cut through acorn squash. Should have just searched YouTube.
    Last edited by Johnny.B.Good; 01-20-2012 at 02:15 PM. Reason: Acorn squash, not butternut.

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    A sharp 10" Forschener chef knife finds butternut squash no hill to climb. ;-)

  9. #9
    Senior Member JanusInTheGarden's Avatar
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    Well since I'm already asking about it, how does the masamoto hc fare with things like squash, large onions, carrots, and potatoes at the 240 length?

    Does it have less to do with thickness and more to do with the shape of the taper? What about a convex grind--how does that fare with these bulkier products?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure wedging has anything to with thickness. It's more about total geometry. In the case of your Hiromoto that means to respect the convexity of the right side, and the flatness of the left one, and to thin and sharpen accordingly. I guess with some reprofiling your Hiro should come back into shape.

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