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  1. #11

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    since nobody paid or got paid, probably not.

  2. #12
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    Man, K, yours are way more interesting than mine!
    No way man. That lime and quats look amazing. I did small batches this time to see what works and doesn't. I don't really have high hopes for the calamondin as it was from my own tree and who knows how that is going to turn out. It is my first year with a calamondin tree.

    I think it will be interesting to see how the blanching versus no blanching turns out. And for spices in one of mine I put cinnamon, a thai chile, bay leaf, and coriander.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  4. #14
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    Btw, I scratched the Indian Lime Pickles from the batting order because I had to get fresh curry leaves and asafetida and there are no Indian groceries in my area.

    I still owe pictures and the pickled cantaloupe recipe but I am traveling right now. Tuesday.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  5. #15

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    OK so my stuff didn't give up nearly enough juice, so I topped them off with juice and adjusted the seasoning.

    Meyer Lemons got more lemon juice and salt.
    Limes got more lime juice, salt, and the chile powder(since they were open already)
    Quats got more salt, sugar, and topped with fresh Texas Ruby Red Grapefruit juice.
    Results:


    Where's everyone else's?? Let's see em!

  6. #16
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    Did you consider just adding oil? That was what I was going to do. Though that David Lebovitz recipe I saw had this 'juice' reduction fix into it.

    Moroccan Preserved Lemons

    Scrub the lemons with a vegetable brush and dry them off.
    Cut off the little rounded bit at the stem end if there’s a hard little piece of the stem attached. From the other end of the lemon, make a large cut by slicing lengthwise downward, stopping about 1-inch (3 cm) from the bottom, then making another downward slice, so you’ve incised the lemon with an X shape.
    Pack coarse salt into the lemon where you made the incisions. Don’t be skimpy with the salt: use about 1 tablespoon per lemon.
    Put the salt-filled lemons in a clean, large glass jar with a tight-fitting lid. Add a few coriander seeds, a bay leaf, a dried chili, and a cinnamon stick if you want. (Or a combination of any of them.)
    Press the lemons very firmly in the jar to get the juices flowing. Cover and let stand overnight.
    The next day do the same, pressing the lemons down, encouraging them to release more juice as they start to soften. Repeat for a 2-3 days until the lemons are completely covered with liquid. If your lemons aren’t too juicy, add more freshly-squeezed lemon juice until their submerged, as I generally have to do.
    After one month, when the preserved lemons are soft, they’re ready to use. Store the lemons in the refrigerator, where they’ll keep for at least 6 months. Rinse before using to remove excess salt.
    To use: Remove lemons from the liquid and rinse. Split in half and scrape out the pulp. Slice the lemon peels into thin strips or cut into small dices. You may wish to press the pulp through a sieve to obtain the flavorful juice, which can be used for flavoring as well, then discard the innards.

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  7. #17

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    I don't want the flavor of the oils. I want the Limes to taste like salt lime chile, the lemons to be super concentrated salty lemons, and the quats to be sweet snacks.

    I also topped off my cabbage today with water. The stuff was dry as the desert sand.

  8. #18
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    Do you guys know any good resources for info on pickling safety? I've always been wary of trying it, because of some of the potential dangers. Having my brain disintegrate doesn't sound all that appealing...

  9. #19
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    I have been eating home made pickled / jarred foods most of my life and I don't think I have any drain bamage.

  10. #20
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    I would pick up a "Ball" Blue Book or a Kerr canning guide - they are updated every couple of years. Should be a fair amount of this info on the interweb also.

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