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Thread: Thinning to the edge...

  1. #1

    Thinning to the edge...

    Late night sharpening, I am thinning my 240mm mizuno gyuto... mostly for fun, and to take some metal off behind the edge, and make it a better cutter. It is taking a VERY long time, so it got me thinking... do you go thin all the way to the edge, making one large(+/-.5") bevel, deburr, then microbevel? Or do you just thin it as long as you feel like it then establish another "primary" bevel? Ive done both in the past, just not on this knife. Blue #1 is resilent. Sheesh

  2. #2
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    On asymmetric monosteel J-knives I want the left to stay as flat as possible. I thin the right, convex side with coarse sandpaper at the lowest angle I feel comfortable with - a few degree. Make sure the scratches don't reach the edge. I use sandpaper in the P120-600 range.
    With cladded blades you will have to remove some soft clad steel, probably on both sides, try with P600.
    Sandpaper works very fast. You're creating a huge convex relief bevel which blends with the blade's geometry. I therefore can't say in general how large that bevel is, but I guess some .5" is very likely.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    If you want to get rid of the existing edge (e.g. with a new knife) go till you raised a burr. Make sure not to do that with your coarsest paper or stone. I would prefer though to vary the thinning angle somewhat to respect the convex geometry. You aren't looking for two flat sides which would cause wedging.

  4. #4
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    +1. For a clad knife you'll have to thin both sides to keep the cladding even. I thin until I establish a new edge and then add a microbevel. I do thinning on Gesshin 400 or Beston 500.

  5. #5
    Thanks guys. I am using the beston 500. It is relatively even on both sides, but i still have not established a "new edge" If were to change the angle, make it more obtuse to create a new edge, would that help convex the edge, if I were to blend it later on. Or should I continue as you say, until I establish a new edge, with the very acute angled wide bevel, then micro bevel.

    Thinning is a wild, tedious process

  6. #6
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I would stay with the blade's geometry. Have you thinned both sides?

  7. #7
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    I thin from around .75" of the blade down to just before the edge, no burr formation. Then I grind in a new primary edge.

  8. #8
    This is where I am at right now in my thinning. Thinned on both sides, about .75" At this point, would you grind another bevel(primary edge) then a micro bevel - this would completely convex the blade, no? That is where my intuition is leading me. Conversely, if i continue to thin until I have one large bevel, with burr, then micro bevel, it would be more of a flatter grind throughout most of the blade, right? Would that encourage food to stick?


    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    I thin from around .75" of the blade down to just before the edge, no burr formation. Then I grind in a new primary edge.

  9. #9
    Keep in mind that if you are thinning by creating your own bevels, I.E. not following the existing grind the maker put there, you are altering the knife in a drastic, fundamental way. If you change the bevels that were originally ground into the face of the blade, make no mistake, you are making a different knife.
    hic sunt dracones

  10. #10
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    Well, I've changed every bevel on every knife I've ever owned, and have always been 100% pleased with the result; new edge outperforming factory by a long shot.....


    That being said, you can thin behind the edge, and still return the factory set bevel; as pointed out above; which would be highly advises, since the thinning angle may be overly acute.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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