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  1. #1
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    No knead bread?

    I just want to play around with that and could do trial and error, but maybe someone here makes it and has a few tips? I have looked online a bit, what I want to do is:

    max. half all purpose flour, the more whole wheat flour the better
    maybe throw in a few flax seeds, rolled oats, other seeds
    make enough for 2 or 3 loafs and keep the dough in the fridge (?)
    get a nice crust on it
    planning to bake in a dutch oven
    prefer denser over too fluffy, hearty over too fine

    Does that work?
    Will I need to add gluten if I use whole wheat?
    Can I just start the dough, let it rise for 12h and then keep it in the fridge until needed? Covered air tight? And then take it out, let it rise for 2-3 hours and bake?

    Any specific recommendations, recipes or other tips?

    Just assume that I am a complete dummy when it comes to baking... I'll be happy to explore other methods, but this seemed like a good and easy place to start before I began thinking about the details... Baguettes and rolls will be next.

    Stefan

    P.S. I remember Warren had some tips on his site but I lost the link, does anybody have that? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    WildBoar's Avatar
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    Warren's site is down. I asked here last month if anyone had heard from him and had no response. "recipesonrails"
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

  3. #3
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    You can go up to 60% whole wheat without adding gluten. With more whole wheat flour, your bread will benefit from prolonged fermentation in the fridge of 2-3 days.

    Peter Reinhart has developed a method of making 100% whole wheat bread, without having to add gluten. It involves making one sponge with dry yeast that stays in the fridge and a second sponge that you leave out overnight for natural yeasts to act on. Then you combine them, add more flour, other bread ingredients, proof and bake:
    http://littlebluehen.com/?p=950

    If you're adding flax seeds they either have to be ground or soaked in water to release their nutritional benefits.

    Here is the classic no-knead bread recipe:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html

  4. #4
    hey, i did a sharpening class for the littlebluehen lady (and her husband)... how cool. I used the NY times version when i did it way back when... came out good.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    hey, i did a sharpening class for the littlebluehen lady (and her husband)... how cool. I used the NY times version when i did it way back when... came out good.
    I've recently started using the nytimes version as well; you want to bump up the temperature to 475-500 though, otherwise the crust is a bit weak

  6. #6
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    I recommended weighing your incredients, you'll get more consistent results.

    Cooking with a dutch oven is great for producing a nice crust, and providing the loaf a nice spring. Preheat oven at 500 deg, with the dutch oven. When you place the dutch oven back in the oven, reduce heat to 450 deg. Bake for 20 minutes with lid on, then 10-20 minutes to finish depending on size of loaf. Internal temperature goal is 210 deg.

    If you're going to buy a no knead bread book, I recommend Peter Reinhart's artisan breads every day. This book has straight forward and simple recipes that will get good bread on the table with little fuss.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I make all our bread, but have an Electrolux Assistent that does the kneading so I don't know how our recipes would work no-knead. I've been working on a multigrain recipe that I use for our regular bread, but I've burned up 2 KitchenAid Professional 600s making it--it's a really heavy dough. (Love the Electrolux--it's TONS better than a KitchenAid. Pricey, but worth it.) I use bread flour instead of AP, but don't add any extra gluten. The white flour is less than half the recipe--it also has oatmeal, oat bran, whole wheat, sunflower seeds, ground flax, a whole grain mix and a high fiber cornstarch from King Arthur. King Arthur makes GREAT flour and baking products. It is really worth the extra money for their flour--baked goods just come out a lot better. They also have a lot of helpful information on their website, if I remeber correctly. I use quick oats rather than old-fashioned rolled oats--they disappear nicely into the dough. I make 3 loaves at a time, and rather than let the extra dough sit in the refrigerator, I spray quart-sized ziploc bags with cooking oil and put a loaf-sized portion of dough in the bag after kneading but before the 1st rise. (If you let your dough sit in the refrigerator too long, it will sour.) Then I toss the bags in the freezer. They keep well, and I just take it out of the freezer the night before I'm ready to bake and put it in the fridge to thaw. Then just go thru a normal rise and bake cycle the next day. The same freezing method works for rolls, etc. "Baking with Julia" (Julia Child) has a good mixed starter bread for baguettes. And for your "starter", you can take a walnut-sized piece of dough from a white bread recipe (or pizza dough--yum!) and put it in the freezer in a ziploc and it will be ready when you are.

    www.thefreshloaf.com is a pretty good forum for bread bakers. People there are as nutty about their bread as people here are about knives.

  8. #8
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    Baguette - no knead - larger loaf

    Photo:

    Title: Baguette - no knead - larger loaf

    Ingredients:

    Default
    2.0 pound Flour, all-purpose
    1.6 pound water
    17.9 gram salt
    2.9 gram Yeast

    Instructions:

    1.

    Weigh all the ingredients into a dough bucket. I use a clear container I bought in the restaruant equipment area at Sam's.

    2.

    Mix by hand in the dough bucket, and let rest 20 minutes.

    3.

    Fold by hand about 20 times, pulling dough away from edge, pulling back over the dough, and slapping back on top.

    4.

    Cover (my bucket came with a lid) and let rest for 20 minutes.

    5.

    Fold by hand about another 20 times, pulling dough away from center and slapping back on top, and let rest for anoterh 20 minutes.

    6.

    Fold by hand (third time), about 15 times. Dough should form a smooth ball by now. Let ferment for 2.5 hours.
    7.

    Pre-shape the dough, and let it rest for a few minutes. Then shape the dough

    8.

    After the 2.5 hour fermentation, the dough will spread out and look a little bubbly on top.

    9.

    Lightly flour the dough while still in the bucket. The top will become the bottom.

    10.

    Flour your work table.
    Use a scraper or bench knife to loosen the sides. Dip the bench knife in flour first, and then scrape between the side of the bucket and the dough. This is a quick down motion, and then back up. Dip in flour again, and repeat in an adjacent area. Repeat, working your way around the bucket. This is just to stop the dough from sticking to the sides of the bucket. Then turn the bucket upside down, reach underneath wiht your scraper, and scrape between the dough and the bottom of the bucket, letting the dough fall onto your floured worktable.

    11.

    Lightly flour the top of the dough, and keep your hands well floured. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces.

    12.

    To shape the dough as a boule, first lay the flat piece on the work table.

    13.

    Then fold the top third over itself.

    14.

    Then fold the upper two corners over on itself.

    15.

    And finally fold the bottom two corners over on itself. Then pick up the dough and tighten into a ball with the seams down. This is hard to explain without pictures, and I didn't have anyone to shoot them as I did it. Maybe some day in the future.

    16.

    Place the rounded shaped dough ball on the worktable or board to rise.

    17.

    Allow to rise till doubled in bulk, about an hour.

    18.

    Sprinkle a peel with some coarse corn meal, and put the dough on the peel.

    19.

    Put the dough into your oven. I like 425 when using an indoor oven, but 500 F when using the BGE.

    20.

    Steam is important for the bread to bake properly. If you look close, my Egg setup is the inverted plate setter, a pan for water, the rack and a pizza stone. I pour water into the pan as I put the bread onto the stone, and then I spray the bread with water just before I close the dome.

    Bake for about 25 minutes.
    21.

    Made a video of the process:

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    sachem allison's Avatar
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    This is warren's recipe
    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    Baguette - no knead - larger loaf

    Photo:

    Title: Baguette - no knead - larger loaf

    Ingredients:

    Default
    2.0 pound Flour, all-purpose
    1.6 pound water
    17.9 gram salt
    2.9 gram Yeast

    Instructions:

    1.

    Weigh all the ingredients into a dough bucket. I use a clear container I bought in the restaruant equipment area at Sam's.

    2.

    Mix by hand in the dough bucket, and let rest 20 minutes.

    3.

    Fold by hand about 20 times, pulling dough away from edge, pulling back over the dough, and slapping back on top.

    4.

    Cover (my bucket came with a lid) and let rest for 20 minutes.

    5.

    Fold by hand about another 20 times, pulling dough away from center and slapping back on top, and let rest for anoterh 20 minutes.

    6.

    Fold by hand (third time), about 15 times. Dough should form a smooth ball by now. Let ferment for 2.5 hours.
    7.

    Pre-shape the dough, and let it rest for a few minutes. Then shape the dough

    8.

    After the 2.5 hour fermentation, the dough will spread out and look a little bubbly on top.

    9.

    Lightly flour the dough while still in the bucket. The top will become the bottom.

    10.

    Flour your work table.
    Use a scraper or bench knife to loosen the sides. Dip the bench knife in flour first, and then scrape between the side of the bucket and the dough. This is a quick down motion, and then back up. Dip in flour again, and repeat in an adjacent area. Repeat, working your way around the bucket. This is just to stop the dough from sticking to the sides of the bucket. Then turn the bucket upside down, reach underneath wiht your scraper, and scrape between the dough and the bottom of the bucket, letting the dough fall onto your floured worktable.

    11.

    Lightly flour the top of the dough, and keep your hands well floured. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces.

    12.

    To shape the dough as a boule, first lay the flat piece on the work table.

    13.

    Then fold the top third over itself.

    14.

    Then fold the upper two corners over on itself.

    15.

    And finally fold the bottom two corners over on itself. Then pick up the dough and tighten into a ball with the seams down. This is hard to explain without pictures, and I didn't have anyone to shoot them as I did it. Maybe some day in the future.

    16.

    Place the rounded shaped dough ball on the worktable or board to rise.

    17.

    Allow to rise till doubled in bulk, about an hour.

    18.

    Sprinkle a peel with some coarse corn meal, and put the dough on the peel.

    19.

    Put the dough into your oven. I like 425 when using an indoor oven, but 500 F when using the BGE.

    20.

    Steam is important for the bread to bake properly. If you look close, my Egg setup is the inverted plate setter, a pan for water, the rack and a pizza stone. I pour water into the pan as I put the bread onto the stone, and then I spray the bread with water just before I close the dome.

    Bake for about 25 minutes.
    21.

    Made a video of the process:

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Here's a few recipes:
    Reinhart's 100% whole wheat hearth bread. As opposed to the blogger, the original recipe has the bread rise overnight to develop the gluten. Then 3 hrs before ready to bake, take the dough out of the fridge. Shape the cold dough, and let rise 2-3 hours until 1.5x in size. http://lalalaraine.tumblr.com/post/6...t-hearth-bread

    Cook's Illustrated take on the no knead bread. Parchment sling if you're using a Dutch oven is nice. http://blog.seattlepi.com/devourings...o-knead-bread/

    +1 for www.thefreshloaf.com

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