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What To Look For In Cutting Board?
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Thread: What To Look For In Cutting Board?

  1. #1

    Question What To Look For In Cutting Board?

    I guess it's a few questions that I'll pose; is there a preferable wood to look for in a board or is it mostly cosmetics? Is there a difference between plastic cutting boards and wood boards?

  2. #2
    Still Plays With Blocks
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    Great question!

    The general rule of thumb for choosing a particular wood is to look for a wood from a tree with a running sap, hard maple = maple syrup, or a tree with edible nuts. If the products of the tree are edible, then the wood should be safe to use. (I can only think of one I would hesitate to use and that is oak. To porous.)

    There is a cosmetics question. If you are looking for functionality, choose maple. If you are loooking to impress, choose walnut. The colors of maple tend to be somewhat bland and the colors of walnut are rich looking.

    Wood boards tend to be easier on good edges and end grain boards are the most forgiving to the edges. Plastic is harder and can damage an edge quicker because it is a bit more sticky. And the deep cut marks are harder to sanitize and clean. Once a plastic board is scarred, the only real alternative is to toss it out and it will last almost forever in a landfill. Wood boards can be resurfaced, cleaned and readied for another hard life of use.

    I hope this helps.

  3. #3
    So the more porous the more bacteria possibility correct?

    Helps a lot, thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    Great question!

    The general rule of thumb for choosing a particular wood is to look for a wood from a tree with a running sap, hard maple = maple syrup, or a tree with edible nuts. If the products of the tree are edible, then the wood should be safe to use. (I can only think of one I would hesitate to use and that is oak. To porous.)

    There is a cosmetics question. If you are looking for functionality, choose maple. If you are loooking to impress, choose walnut. The colors of maple tend to be somewhat bland and the colors of walnut are rich looking.

    Wood boards tend to be easier on good edges and end grain boards are the most forgiving to the edges. Plastic is harder and can damage an edge quicker because it is a bit more sticky. And the deep cut marks are harder to sanitize and clean. Once a plastic board is scarred, the only real alternative is to toss it out and it will last almost forever in a landfill. Wood boards can be resurfaced, cleaned and readied for another hard life of use.

    I hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Check this study of the bacteria and wood cutting board issue by the University of California at Davis: CLICK ME
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  5. #5
    Still Plays With Blocks
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    Doug,

    Saw a photo of your cherry board on another forum. Still looks great and does not appear to have darkened much at all.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by FryBoy View Post
    Check this study of the bacteria and wood cutting board issue by the University of California at Davis: CLICK ME
    Wow, very cool. Thank you.

  7. #7
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    What to look for? A burnt-in logo on the side that says BoardSMITH
    __________
    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

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    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post
    What to look for? A burnt-in logo on the side that says BoardSMITH
    That's a good one. But then the hard part comes: picking the wood.

  9. #9
    Senior Member FryBoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The BoardSMITH View Post
    Doug,

    Saw a photo of your cherry board on another forum. Still looks great and does not appear to have darkened much at all.
    Yes, I'm very happy with my cherry board, and would highly recommend The Boardsmith to anyone considering such a purchase. The quality is simply outstanding.

    Here's my board in a fairly recent photo:





    In this closeup photo it does show a bit of darkening (lighting plays a big role -- this one is no flash, the above is with flash). It's also starting to show a few minor knife marks as I would expect after nearly two years of daily use:





    Care is important. I massage it with mineral oil when it starts to look dry, which it will after a few washings with hot water, dish soap, and a vegetable scrub brush, and I then add a coat of beeswax using Dave's Board Butter (a mixture of bee's wax and mineral oil).
    Doug Collins
    Hermosa Beach, California

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by WildBoar View Post
    What to look for? A burnt-in logo on the side that says BoardSMITH
    +1
    Gave a rec to a friend for one of your boards. She refuses to use her new jknife until her Boardsmith board is delivered.
    Fortunately, she has POS Furi knives to use on her POS bamboo boards while she waits...

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